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Jennifer Dias ’16: Organizing a no-cost clinic with the Chenango United Way

August 3, 2015
Jenn Dias (right) is a biology and Spanish literature double major from South River, N.J.

Jenn Dias (right) is a biology and Spanish literature double major from South River, N.J.

Editor’s note: In this series, Colgate students share stories about their summer experiences in offices, labs, and open spaces across the world.

This summer, I’ve had the pleasure of working with the Chenango United Way (CUW) through a fellowship with Colgate’s Upstate Institute Summer Field School. The CUW funds programs that address issues regarding health, income, and education. I’ve learned the ins-and-outs of the CUW, from marketing and finance to how the organization seeks to make a local impact.

Because of its focus on health, the CUW is a leading community organization in the Greater Chenango Cares: Innovative Readiness Training (IRT) mission. This collaborative health care project among Chenango County organizations was a project led by the Department of Defense as preparation for wartime and disaster missions. For each IRT mission, the military serves high-need areas across the country, while partnering with leading community organizations.

This summer, the IRT mission chosen for Chenango County was a clinic at Norwich High School from July 13–22. The clinic included free medical, dental, optical, and veterinary services. Altogether, we served approximately 2,500 residents with the help of more than 500 volunteers.

As the CUW intern for this project, I sat on the IRT planning committee, which was responsible for the logistics and operations sections of the mission, as well as budgeting and volunteer recruitment.

As an aspiring doctor, this experience has shown me the importance of compassion, and allowed me to embrace the privilege of serving.


I’m judging you – by Roxanne Maduro ’17

July 31, 2015
Colgate students are in Bogata, Columbia at a spanish debate comeptition

Roxanne Maduro ’17, an Environmental Sciences major from Bronx, N.Y., (third from left) is one of four Colgate students participating in CMUDE 2015 as a judge

Editor’s note: Colgate students are in Bogata, Columbia at CMUDE, a Spanish debate competition. This post appeared originally on the off-campus study blog. See more pictures from the trip.  

Debating is not easy. You have 15 minutes to prepare a persuasive and informed argument on a topic you may or may not know and then another seven to speak about it, all while attempting to sound confident in a claim that you may not necessarily believe in, but have to prove to be true nevertheless.

If you are told your position is to prove that 2+2=5, your job is to make the judges and the opposition feel like they are complete fools for ever having believed otherwise. I hold extreme respect for students who challenge themselves by debating, especially those in our Spanish Language Debate Society team, who not only have to debate, but do it in another language.

While I admit that debating is hard, the alternative — judging a debate — is not easy either. Debating and judging are both very difficult for different reasons, and require different skill sets to be successful. If you are a great debater, you can still turn out to be a terrible judge, and vice versa.

The role that proves to be harder varies by individual. People who are very quick on their feet and love to challenge others’ opinions without having to consider the other side of things most likely would be great debaters but terrible judges.

Although some people have traits that predispose them to be a good judge, there are techniques and ways of thinking for particularly exceptional judges. To begin, you have to train yourself to be very detail oriented because the smallest nuance that you notice in an argument can have a large impact on the results of a debate. After that, it’s all in the notes.

When I started out as a judge, I was a mess. I would sit and take very careful and tedious notes during the debates that I judged, but when it came time to deliberate, I had absolutely nothing to say. By the end of the fourth round, it reached the point where I was the head judge and was the person that said the least out of the three panelists. I couldn’t figure out what I was doing wrong.

Eventually, I decided to look over my notes for the last four rounds, and just like that, I found the problem. I was taking notes like a debater. I wrote down the arguments, rebuttals, and anything else of importance in the speech itself, but did nothing to actually analyze what was being said, what points were stronger, and most importantly, the interaction between the arguments of opposing debaters.

I realized then that judging was twice as hard as debating in terms of note taking. Like debaters, you should keep track of arguments and rebuttals, but you also have to see which arguments are stronger, whether another team responded to the argument, if it was a sufficient response, whether points were elaborated upon, whether teams fulfilled their roles, and so much more.

The strongest teams are always those that make the strongest arguments, develop them, and destroy the bases of each opposing argument, point by point. A judge has to try to be as objective as possible and not hold any bias toward a motion or a debater. This wouldn’t be so bad if it were not for the fact that we’re not even allowed to laugh at a humorous comment or an entertaining debate in general, because judges are supposed to be as non-interferential as possible, and laughing could possibly distract from the debate.

I think that everyone, if given the chance, should debate at one point or another in their lives, because it has so many benefits with regards to reasoning, logic, and public speaking in general. But on a deeper level, judging has helped me begin to develop a new mindset and critical viewpoint that I would not have had if I just debated.

Being able to judge in CMUDE for this past week has allowed me to collaborate with students and professors who have years of experience as panelists, meet dozens of different teams from around the world, and most amazingly, learn from the vastly different experiences and lessons that my fellow Colgate teammates and I were able to go through in the exact same tournament.

Roxanne Maduro ’17.


Students present summer research

July 24, 2015

Poster-presentations_WEB

From photochemical pathways to early animation devices to homosexuality in the Arab world — undergraduate research topics explored this summer by students and faculty were presented at yesterday’s poster session.  Read more


Grace Littlefield ’16: Growing at the Colgate Community Garden

July 22, 2015
Littlefield is an environmental geography major from Brooklyn, N.Y.

Littlefield is an environmental geography major from Brooklyn, N.Y. (Photo by Andrew Daddio)

Editor’s note: In this series, Colgate students share stories about their summer experiences in offices, labs, and open spaces across the world.

This summer, I am interning at the Colgate Community Garden. As a local source of organically grown food, the garden is a great asset and educational tool for the university’s sustainability program. Read more


Adam Basciano ’16: Interning with the Senate Foreign Relations Committee

July 20, 2015
Adam-Basciano-Colgate

Adam Basciano, originally from Randolph, N.J., is living and working in Washington, D.C., this summer.

Editor’s note: In this series, Colgate students share stories about their summer experiences in offices, labs, and open spaces across the world.

Just following the July 4 holiday, I began my summer internship working for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, under the minority leadership of Senator Ben Cardin of Maryland. The past two weeks have truly offered many amazing and, at times, surreal experiences here on Capitol Hill.

Upon our arrival, the three other interns and myself were assigned to senior committee staff members based on our interests and previous experiences. As an international relations major with a focus on the Middle East, and having just returned from a semester abroad in Jerusalem, Israel, I was very excited to learn that I would be working with the Middle East and North Africa team.

While the recently announced Iran nuclear deal seems to have taken over every agency and think tank in the city, there are other topic areas relevant to the region that I have been able to explore. Each week, I sit in on meetings with policy makers and Middle Eastern representatives on matters ranging from Tunisia’s growing democracy to the ongoing humanitarian crisis in Syria.

With regards to the Iranian deal reached in Vienna, Austria, last week, it has certainly made coming into work that much more exciting and dynamic. Between attending events on and off the hill and preparing the committee staff and senators for our first hearing on the issue this week, I have definitely been kept busy.

At this important and historic juncture for our country and the international community, I am extremely grateful to be in our nation’s capital working on these important issues. I am also very appreciative of the support from Colgate and our Center for Career Services, as well as the countless courses that have prepared me for this opportunity.

[More: Read Professor Nina Moore’s take on the Iranian Deal]


New grant supports the science of mind reading

July 15, 2015
Professor Bruce Hansen works with students to prepare a test subject for a brain scan.

Professor Bruce Hansen works with students to prepare a test subject as they try to determine whether electroencephalography captures the brain interpreting everyday experiences. (Photo by Andy Daddio)

Colgate Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience Bruce Hansen probably should have predicted his recent $600,000 James S. McDonnell Foundation award to fund the next six to eight years’ worth of lab work with dozens of students.

After all, his research could easily be considered mind reading.

Read more


Warren Dennis ’16: Preparing for NASA’s future by understanding its past

July 13, 2015
Warren Dennis

Warren Dennis ’16 in front of the Space Shuttle Discovery

Editor’s note: In this series, Colgate students share stories about their summer experiences in offices, labs, and open spaces across the world.

This summer, I’m interning for the History Program Office of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in Washington, D.C. By providing easy access to information about its past successes and failures, the history office helps NASA to grow and better prepare for future situations. Read more


Susan Price ’16 presents at UN Human Rights Council

July 8, 2015

Susan-price-2_WEBIt’s almost unheard of for an undergraduate student to present a statement at a United Nations (UN) session. Yet, Susan Price ’16 has done so not just once, but twice. Most recently, on June 18, Price presented at the 29th session of the UN Human Rights Council. Read more


Madison Paulk ’16: Conducting social research in South Africa

July 6, 2015
Madison Paulk '16, a political science and African studies double major from Buffalo, N.Y. atop the Moses Mabhida Stadium in Durban, built for the 2010 World Cup.

Madison Paulk ’16, a political science and African studies double major from Buffalo, N.Y., atop the Moses Mabhida Stadium in Durban.

Editor’s note: In this series, Colgate students share stories about their summer experiences in offices, labs, and open spaces across the world.

This summer, I am in Durban, South Africa, conducting research with Congolese refugees through first-hand communication. Read more


Katie Fallon ’16 gets the story, runs with it

June 30, 2015

Katie Fallon ’16 is spending the summer interning for CBS News in Washington, D.C., and it’s a far cry from making copies and getting coffee for this political science major from Hillsborough, Calif. Read her account of the experience at CBSNews.comRead more


Kevin Costello ’16: Interning with congressman on Capitol Hill

June 23, 2015
Kevin Costello '16 stands in the office of Congressman Hanna on Capitol Hill

Kevin Costello ’16, philosophy, Concord, Calif.

Editor’s note: In this series, Colgate students share stories about their summer experiences in offices, labs, and open spaces across America.

While I’m only in the third week of my internship with Congressman Richard Hanna, Capitol Hill has been incredibly exciting for me so far. Read more


Overheard at this week’s Colgate Writers’ Conference

June 19, 2015
Participants from this week's Colgate Writers' Conference gathered for a reception at Merrill House.

Participants from this week’s Colgate Writers’ Conference gathered for a reception at Merrill House.

Now in its 20th year, the Colgate Writers’ Conference has blossomed into a cooperative literary haven for writers of all ages and literary interests. This past week, more than 40 writers enjoyed workshops, craft talks, and readings. For many, it was the opportunity to return to a collegiate environment (several even experienced an early morning fire alarm in a first-year residence hall) ripe with intellectual sharing and inspiration. They came, they wrote, they collaborated. Here are some reflections: Read more


Chorus and chamber singers tour Europe

June 17, 2015
Ryan Endris leads the Colgate University Chorus in Vienna. Photo by Dylan Crouse

Ryan Endris leads the Colgate University Chamber Singers in Vienna. Photo by Dylan Crouse ’15

In May, the University Chorus and Chamber Singers had the opportunity to perform the program for their spring concert in the places where the musical pieces would have originally been heard. During the nine-day tour, we held four concerts: in Prague, Bratislava, Vienna, and Budapest. Read more


Downtown incubator abuzz as Colgate Entrepreneurs Fund winners go to work

June 10, 2015
Amanda Brown '15 (left) talks to a student at eWeekend. Brown is one of six eFund winners working in the Thought Into Action incubator space in Hamilton, N.Y. this summer.

Amanda Brown ’15 (left) talks with a student at  Entrepreneur Weekend in April. Brown is one of six eFund winners working in the Thought Into Action incubator space in Hamilton, N.Y., this summer.

Being selected for the Colgate Entrepreneurs Fund (eFund) can change everything for a fledgling start-up, especially when combined with incubator space and direct access to Thought Into Action alumni-mentor support for an entire summer in Hamilton, N.Y.

The $15,000 award that comes with selection opens doors for these new ventures. Some use the funding to hire product engineers, web developers, advertising buys, or just use the capital to allow for full-time work on an idea that otherwise would be attended to only after working another job.

Read more


Exploring the intersection of MoMA’s print and digital marketing

June 8, 2015
Lauren Casella '15 at MoMA, where she is interning for the summer

Lauren Casella ’16 at New York City’s Museum of Modern Art, where she is interning for the summer

Editor’s note: This blog post is the first in a series written by students about their summer experiences.

Last week, I started my internship in New York City, working for the marketing department at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). Housing collections of architecture, design, drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, and film, MoMA is regarded as one of the most influential modern art museums in the world. Read more


Colgate honors first-generation graduates

May 27, 2015
First Generation Lunch photo

Students, faculty, family, and friends gathered at the inaugural First Generation Luncheon last week. (Photo by Daniel DeVries)

It started with one student standing to thank her family for their support at the inaugural First-Generation Luncheon during commencement weekend.

“I think I’m here to thank you, not just for your sacrifices in the past four years, but for everything you’ve done in my life,” said the political science major from the Bronx, N.Y.

Read more


Colgate University celebrates 194th commencement

May 18, 2015
Graduation cap from Commencement 2015 reading "Fortune favors the bold."

Photo by Andrew Daddio

During commencement exercises yesterday, Colgate University extended congratulations to the Class of 2015, family members cheered, and seniors enjoyed one final class together as undergraduates.

The lesson came in three parts. First, President Jeffrey Herbst reflected on America’s cultural obsession with being busy and asked students to reconsider how they answer the simple question, “How are you?”

“When asked how you are, never say ‘busy,’ Herbst said. “Rather than expressing to others the velocity at which you are doing things, why not discuss what you are doing?”

Read more


Baccalaureate speaker tells graduates: “You’re not ducking for the camera”

May 18, 2015
Rev. Gay Clark Jennings. Photo by Gerard Gaskin

Rev. Gay Clark Jennings ’74 delivered Saturday’s baccalaureate address. Photo by Gerard Gaskin

When Rev. Gay Clark Jennings ’74 was a student in Colgate’s first graduating class of women, she was part of historic change. A varsity volleyball player, she pressed the university’s president for equal medical benefits for female athletes under Title IX; investigated grocery store price gouging in Madison County’s poorest areas; and marched against the war in Vietnam. Read more


Commencement is live at 10:30

May 17, 2015

Today, Colgate sends 732 freshly minted alumni into the world. Valedictorian is John Robert Murphy of Bainbridge Island, Wash., graduating with a 4.10, summa cum laude, with high honors in international relations. Salutatorian, with 4.03 GPA is Ariel Elizabeth Sherry of Needham, Mass, a psychology and religion double major. Sherry also earned summa cum laude distinction and high honors in psychology.

Eddie S. Glaude Jr., the William S. Tod Professor of Religion and African American studies and the chair of the Center for African American Studies at Princeton University, will deliver the keynote address at today’s 194th commencement.

Livestream starts at 10:30 at www.colgate.edu.


Colgate University’s Task Force on Performing Arts Facilities submits final report

May 11, 2015
Theater students on stage in "Wald, a wondertale"

Colgate’s Task Force on Performing Arts Facilities has submitted its final report regarding space for theater, dance, and music on campus (Photo by Duy Trinh ’14 of the Children’s Theater Workshop presentation “Wald, a wondertale”)

Colgate’s Task Force on Performing Arts Facilities, chaired by Professor of Art and Art History Padma Kaimal, has submitted its final report to the university community. The document offers recommendations to revitalize the creative landscape on campus.

President Jeffrey Herbst formed the task force in spring 2014, responding to a call made in the university’s new strategic plan for a comprehensive review of Colgate’s dance, music, and theater performance spaces. While the group is not an official building committee, its findings will inform future decisions and financial models developed by the administration and approved by the Board of Trustees.

“Colgate has long recognized the contributions that the performing arts can make to a liberal arts education,” said President Herbst. “The task force has produced an important document that can serve as a roadmap for the future.”

Read more


Japanese Speech Contest fosters cultural connections

May 8, 2015
Photo by Zoe Zhong '17

The Japanese Speech Contest, now in its 13th year, was open to students of Japanese and all other disciplines. Photo by Zoe Zhong ’17

The Japanese Speech contest celebrated its 13th year this April with a lineup of 13 competing speakers and a variety of Japanese food and performances. Read more


Alexandria Dyer ’14 awarded a Fulbright to conduct research in Ghana

May 6, 2015

Alexandria Dyer ’14, of Portland, Ore., has been awarded a Fulbright research grant to travel to Ghana to study public health.

Dyer will conduct research on the empowering social space of women’s hair salons and will then develop a pilot women’s health workshop for these informal settings.

Read more


Members of Colgate Class of 2015 award their Torch Medals

May 1, 2015
Ben Cook '15 gave his torchmedal to Roxanne Benson

Ben Cook ’15 gave his Torch Medal to Roxanne Benson, the administrative assistant for Outdoor Education.

From professors to deans, food service employees to athletic coaches, and many more, countless individuals contribute to students’ academic and personal growth while at Colgate. This spring, members of the Class of 2015 are recognizing those who have influenced their time over the last four years by honoring them with Torch Medals. Read more


Roleplaying club brings people together through storytelling

April 30, 2015
Colgate's Roleplaying Game Society. Photo by Anna Heil '16

Colgate’s Roleplaying Game Society brings together students, faculty, and staff. Photo by Anna Heil ’16

A jungle ranger, an alchemist, a nomadic bard, and a cleric of the sun goddess struggle to save a fantasy desert region from a war fueled by racial discrimination. In other words, a small group of Colgate students, staff, and faculty members are gathered together in the Coop for their weekly role-playing game session. This group is just one segment of a new organization on campus called the Colgate Roleplaying Game (RPG) Society. Read more


Leader of campus reform earns 1819 Award, Colgate’s highest honor

April 28, 2015
Kori Strother '15 receives the 1819 Award

Kori Strother ’15 accepts the 1819 Award from President Herbst at the awards ceremony. (Photo by Andy Daddio)

Kori Strother ’15, an Africana & Latin American studies major from Saint Louis, Mo., is the 2015 recipient of Colgate’s 1819 Award, the highest student honor granted by the university.

The 1819 Award is given annually to one student representing character, sportsmanship, scholarship, and service above and beyond their peers. While this year’s winner represents all of those qualities, she also had the courage to look Colgate in the eye to say, “you can do better.”

Read more