Home News
Colgate News

Internship blog series: asking important questions

August 29, 2016
Angelica Greco '18, left, and Julia Feikens stand in front of

Angelica Greco, left, and Julia Feikens in the city of Oswego, where they conducted interviews.

During the summer months, Colgate students fanned out across the globe to apply their liberal arts know-how in a variety of real-world settings. They wrote back to campus to keep our community posted on their progress. Angelica Greco ’18, from Bethesda, Md., and Julia Feikens ’18, from West Nyack, N.Y., described their travels through upstate New York as they investigated the closure of nuclear power plants.

Our research this summer tied into a larger question that our mentor, Professor Dai Yamamoto, has been studying: how does the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant impact the community that hosts it?

With Professor Yamamoto on sabbatical in Japan, we planned, organized, and carried out independent research focusing specifically on the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Plant, located in Scriba, N.Y., half an hour away from Hamilton.

The FitzPatrick plant, having been unprofitable for the past few years, was scheduled for decommissioning in January of 2017.

For this summer’s research, we gathered qualitative, on-site data by interviewing stakeholders in Scriba and Oswego County. We interviewed people involved in local government and school systems to give us a picture of how the plant’s closure would affect the community from a variety of perspectives.

The picture that emerged during interviews was what we expected: the loss of the FitzPatrick plant would have a serious impact on many parts of the community. In addition to employing 615 people in a county that already struggles with high unemployment and poverty rates, the plant contributes vital revenue to the local school districts, the Scriba town government, and Oswego County.

But getting the information we needed and reaching the heart of the matter wasn’t always easy for us. Having to plan and conduct interviews by ourselves meant that both of us had to sharpen our interview skills. Banal “how do you feel about that?” questions just didn’t cut it this summer.

We asked interviewees about the future — were they optimistic about Scriba and Oswego County? Would the loss of the FitzPatrick plant, a large, well-paying employer, devastate the community? Were people worried about how the decommissioning of FitzPatrick will affect the programs in the local school system or access to municipal services?

The responses fell all across the spectrum: while interviewees were worried about their community’s future, many were also optimistic. People were hopeful that revenue from the Novelis aluminum plant and the two other nuclear power facilities in the area would be able to help make up for the loss of FitzPatrick. Participants were also optimistic about a government plan to subsidize FitzPatrick and other struggling nuclear plants. The subsidies may be enough to keep the plant open.

We learned that the overall situation was more complicated than we initially anticipated. However, this offered us more opportunities to learn about the different dynamics of communities that interact with nuclear decommissioning.

While growing our connections in the area, we also learned more about how nuclear plants affect far more than economies in an area. They aid in social events and support local organizations with time and effort. In order to create a whole picture of Oswego County, it was necessary to learn as much as possible about each facet. Consequently, our research and perspectives improved drastically by looking at every angle the plant’s relationship with the county.

Many of the issues that we asked participants about are delicate, and being caring, sympathetic listeners was very important. While we started this summer with varying levels of interview experience, we both undoubtedly grew as interviewers and researchers.


Summer internship blog series: a capital experience

Summer internship blog series: little dogs living longer

Career Services: Summer internship funding

Colgate University Center for Career Services


Colgate welcomes the class of 2020

August 26, 2016
Students and parents gather on campus for first-year Move-in Day

Students and parents make their way to residence halls Sunday, August 21, during first-year Move-in Day. (Photo by Andrew Daddio)

Thirty minutes before the doors opened to the James C. Colgate Student Union, a line of first-year students and their families began to form in anticipation of new student registration Sunday morning.

Huashuo Zhang ’20 and Carrie Zhang ’20 were part of the line, waiting to receive information about the next three days of orientation. The two girls, both from China, met during last week’s International Student Orientation, where first-years who hail from outside of the United States learn about on-campus resources.

“I’m excited to start school and begin meeting classmates,” Carrie enthused. She and Huashuo are two of the 77 international students currently enrolled in the Class of 2020.

In addition to International Student Orientation, other first-year pre-orientation programs included Wilderness Adventure, Maroon-News, WRCU radio, Raider Pep Band, Masque and Triangle, and community outreach.

Student-athletes like cross-country runner Emily Peck ’20 also arrived early, in order to practice during the pre-season. “The campus is very welcoming,” she said. “You can tell that everyone’s excited for us to be here.”

From cheering on students as they arrived, to helping move belongings, to answering questions about move-in day and campus life, student workers from Link staff and residential life created this welcoming atmosphere.

“Keeping the mood up and getting everyone excited is our main goal,” said Lila Sullivan ’17, a Link staff member who was posted outside of the student union to talk to students and families. “We make sure we’re a resource for them, like we are during the school year.”

The Class of 2020 comprises 755 students who “truly represent the best of Colgate, not only in their excellent academic record, but also through their demonstrated commitment to community service and making the world a better place,” said Vice President and Dean of Admission and Financial Aid Gary Ross ’77.

“Every year, the Colgate admission team receives an enormous amount of support from faculty, staff, and hundreds of students, so I am most grateful to the many members of the Colgate community who helped to build this tremendous class of scholars and future leaders.”

Arrival day 2016

A senior in the city, preparing for the real world

August 18, 2016
Ryan Diew stands on stage and speaks to panelists

Ryan Diew speaks to a panel of entrepreneur experts at Colgate’s Entrepreneur Weekend 2016. (Photo by Gerard Gaskin)

Editor’s note: Ryan Diew ’17 is already preparing for graduation next May. In a series of posts during the upcoming academic year, Diew will track his progress through the Center for Career Services’ Real World program — signature events and workshops that prepare seniors for life on the other side of the commencement stage. Real World events are also powered by the Colgate Professional Networks.

Recently, I had the incredible opportunity to attend the Colgate Seniors in the City event in San Francisco. Seniors in the City is a networking program — part of the Center for Career Services’ Real World series — that provides students, parents, and alumni with a venue where they can talk and make lasting connections in order to help ease the transition after graduation.

I was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area (Oakland to be specific — Go, Warriors!), so I was impressed and incredibly excited to meet so many Colgate alumni who have ventured out west.

I was able to connect with professionals working in careers that intersected with each of my school activities, interests, and experiences: I am a computer science major and a member of the Colgate Men’s Basketball team. I am also a part of Link Staff and Colgate’s Google Student Ambassador. Most recently, I founded my own company, Trippie, through Thought into Action. Trippie is a mobile application that helps travelers better navigate airports. (We expect to be in the App Store this Fall, so be on the lookout!)

I had the opportunity to interact with athletes and fellow entrepreneurs, as well as professionals who have worked for some of the biggest tech companies in the world. In addition, I was able to strengthen connections with classmates who are also interested in starting their professional careers in the Bay Area.

One of the reasons Colgate is so special is because of its amazing alumni network. During my time at Colgate, I have been afforded numerous opportunities and have made many lasting connections. This was reinforced multiple times at Seniors in the City, when an overwhelming majority of alumni encouraged us to reach out to other alumni for opportunities as well as advice. They emphasized that Colgate grads would be more than excited to help if we reached out. A simple LinkedIn message or e-mail introduction could really change a life. Seniors in the City underscored the beauty of the Colgate connection. Colgate alumni really look out for one another.

It’s great to know that, based on conversations I had in San Francisco, I will enter the professional world having forged strong relationships and alliances with those who are also transitioning into the “real world.”

Center for Career Services
Thought Into Action
Trippie – The Answer to Tired, Hungry and Grumpy

Summer internship blog series: a capital experience

August 18, 2016
Doug Whelan '19 in his Washington, D.C. office

Doug Whelan ’19 in his Washington, D.C., office

Colgate students have fanned out across the globe to apply their liberal arts know-how in a variety of real-world settings. They are writing back to campus to keep our community posted on their progress. Doug Whelan ’19, from Webster, N.Y., wrote about his legislative internship in the nation’s capital.

This summer, I was lucky enough to work as a legislative intern in the Washington, D.C., office of my home-district congresswoman, Louise M. Slaughter, gaining valuable experience in government and politics.

I was doubly fortunate to be working in the office of one of the most experienced leaders of the House of Representatives. Representative Slaughter is the oldest woman in Congress and has represented the Rochester, N.Y., area for nearly 30 years. She currently sits as the ranking member of the Rules Committee, which she chaired from 2007 to 2011. During that time, she was instrumental in moving landmark legislation, such as the Affordable Care Act and the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act, through Congress.

My job as an intern varied from day to day, but primary tasks included answering phone calls; replying to constituent inquiries by researching policy issues relevant to their questions and then drafting response letters; providing tours of the Capitol building to visiting members of the district; and relaying information that I gathered at policy briefings to legislative staffers.

One of the most enriching elements of my time in Washington was the opportunity to listen to famous speakers, including House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, Senator Jeff Merkley, and Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson. At the end of the internship, I completed a research project on a piece of pending legislation of my choice. The project included a set of memos to be delivered to the congresswoman.

While my internship was full of unforgettable memories, I will always remember the days following the tragic shooting in Orlando, Fla., when I sat in the House gallery watching Representative Slaughter participate in the gun control sit-in. It was a rare opportunity to witness civic action firsthand at the highest levels of our democracy.

Spending the summer on Capitol Hill affirmed my commitment to public service as a personal passion and long-term career goal. While I was sad to leave a place that so often felt like the center of universe, I know I’ll be back in the future to build on the experience I’ve gained.

Whelan wasn’t the only person interning in Congress. Here are a couple posts saying thank you to Colgate students for their work during the summer.


Summer internship blog series: little dogs living longer
Summer internship blog series: Colgate’s back pages
Career Services: Summer internship funding
Colgate University Center for Career Services

Summer internship blog series: little dogs living longer

August 11, 2016
Colgate students have fanned out across the globe to apply their liberal arts know-how in a variety of real-world settings. They are writing back to campus to keep our community posted on their progress. Josh Winward ’18, from Scarsdale, N.Y., wrote about his research.
portrait of Josh Winward ’18

Josh Winward ’18

I am on campus conducting research with Professor Ana Jimenez on the effects of oxidative stress, which scientists believe is one of the leading causes of aging in animals. This is a fairly new topic of study, because scientists did not connect oxidative stress to aging until the late 2000s.

Oxidative stress deals with the balance between pro-oxidants — molecules that damage cells and membranes — and antioxidants, which stop damage. Both are produced during cellular respiration, the main mechanism by which bodies turn food into energy. When the process works correctly, it produces antioxidants, but less than 2 percent of the time it produces pro-oxidants instead.

Our research deals with oxidative stress and aging in dogs. Small dogs tend to live longer than large dogs, even though small dogs have slower metabolic rates and in almost every other mammalian species, animals with slower metabolism have shorter lifespans than animals with faster rates. We believe oxidative stress is behind this aging anomaly.

The summer was split into two parts. During the first two weeks, my lab partner, Alex Ionescu ’19, and I familiarized ourselves with mountains of journal articles on oxidative stress and its effects. We also asked vets from central New York for dog skin samples.

The second part of our summer has consisted of lab work. When we receive a sample from the vet, we isolate the primary fibroblasts (connective tissue cells) in our lab. Fibroblasts are easily manipulated. By using chemicals to break the tissue into a solution, we can then use a centrifuge to separate those cells from everything else. We then plate the separated cells in specialized flasks and incubate them to grow for a week before we analyze them.

Once we have enough cells, we run different tests to measure rates of oxygen consumption and glycolysis, antioxidant content, pro-oxidant content, and amount of membrane damage. All of these measurements help us to determine what it is about small dogs that let them live longer than large dogs.

As a rising junior, I am grateful for the opportunity to do primary research, and this experience has made me want to continue down this path after I graduate.


Summer internship blog series: Colgate’s back pages

Summer internship blog series: Colgate’s third culture kids

Career Services: Summer research funding

Colgate University Center for Career Services

Summer internship blog series: Colgate’s third culture kids

July 26, 2016
8 Mariam Nael Headshot

Self-described Third Culture Kid and researcher Mariam Nael ’18

Colgate students have fanned out across the globe to apply their liberal arts know-how in a variety of real-world settings. They are writing back to campus to keep our community posted on their progress. This article was written by Mariam Nael ’18, a women’s studies major from Singapore, completing a student-initiated research fellowship with the university studies division. 

My parents are Pakistani, but I have lived in Singapore, Dubai, Hong Kong, and New York City. The way I see myself has changed a little since I arrived at Colgate — I think my race and ethnicity have become stronger facets of my identity.

One day, I was chatting with some friends from high school about our cultural identity, and I realized that studying the shifts would be an interesting summer research project. Luckily, Colgate has a great program to conduct student-initiated summer research (with funding).

I quickly reached out to Meika Loe, professor of sociology and women’s studies. She helped me focus my idea and supported my proposal, and, fortunately, my proposal was accepted.

According to sociologist David Pollock, a Third Culture Kid (TCK) is defined as someone “who has spent a significant part of his or her developmental years outside [their] parents’ culture.” The “third” culture refers to the mixing of the host country’s culture (the country in which he or she lives) and his or her parents’ culture.

The purpose of my research is to learn about how Third Culture Kids form their personal and cultural identity, especially in college, and whether they experience a shift in the way they self-identify. Additionally, I am interested in whether there is a difference in the formation of identity with non-white TCKs and white TCKs.

Throughout the last month, I have been conducting 45 to 90 minute interviews in Singapore with Third Culture Kids between the ages of 18 and 24. Additionally, I have begun transcribing interviews and systematically coding them for themes. The next step is to analyze them and write a research paper.

It has been fascinating hearing their stories and seeing the similarities and differences not only between the interviewees, but with my own experience as a TCK.

This has been a tough, but valuable, learning process. I wish to continue studying TCKs and identity formation throughout the next few years, hopefully using different methods as well. I am planning to write a research paper, and hopefully, down the line, will try to present or publish it.

Related links:

Summer internship blog series: (NBC)Universal skills

Summer internship blog series: a relentless pursuit of justice

Career Services: Summer Internship Funding

Colgate University Center for Career Services

Summer internship blog series: (NBC)Universal skills

July 14, 2016
Beni Geisler '18 at NBC News Group headquarters in New York City.

Benji Geisler ’18 at NBC News Group headquarters in New York City.

Colgate students have fanned out across the globe to apply their liberal arts know-how in a variety of real-world settings. They are writing back to campus to keep our community posted on their progress. This article was written by Benjamin Geisler ’18, an art and art history major from Groton, N.Y., interning at the NBC News network.

This summer, I am working at NBCUniversal in New York City as a creative marketing intern for the NBC News Group. (Even though technically I am an intern for NBC News network, I often work on projects for MSNBC as well.)

As a creative marketing intern, I get to work under the creative directors, producers, and editors in the NBC News and MSNBC marketing departments to help produce promotional spots for television. These are the videos – aired on NBC News and MSNBC – used to advertise upcoming programs, network specials, and more.

The two programs I primarily work with are the TODAY show and Nightly News with Lester Holt. It is my job to pull specific archival footage at the request of the marketing producers for upcoming spots. I also log the programs and create written transcripts that can be used to recall specific segments or moments of the show, and their respective time codes, when looking for future promotional material.

One of the best parts of my job is getting to see the finished spot on television once it has been delivered. Working under so many different producers and editors for various programs means it can be hard to keep track of every project, but it is really rewarding to see an NBC News or MSNBC spot on television knowing I helped produce it.

It is an incredibly exciting time to work at NBCUniversal, especially with the News Group, this summer. Between the upcoming Olympic Games in Rio (to which NBCUniversal has exclusive rights), MSNBC’s twentieth anniversary, the political conventions, and the presidential election, there is a lot of material to cover, market, and produce.

Even working in 30 Rockefeller Plaza, surrounded by some of the most talented professionals in media and entertainment, has been a great opportunity. Just this Monday, I had the chance to hear Colgate graduate and president and CEO of NBCUniversal Steve Burke ’80 speak and give professional advice.

My work as a creative marketing intern at NBCUniversal has provided me with a great insight into the creative production processes behind television marketing. This is only my first summer at NBCUniversal, but I would love to return sometime in the future, possibly as a page.

Related links:

Summer internship blog series: a relentless pursuit of justice

Summer internship blog series: 4th down and 24 hours to go

Colgate University Center for Career Services

Summer internship blog series: a relentless pursuit of justice

July 11, 2016
Madison Bailey '18 is pictured infron of the offices of the Pennsylvania Innocence Project headquarters

Madison Bailey ’18 at the Pennsylvania Innocence Project headquarters

Colgate students have fanned out across the globe to apply their liberal arts know-how in a variety of real-world settings. They are writing back to campus to keep our community posted on their progress. This article was written by Madison Bailey ’18, a peace and conflict studies major from Wayne, Pa.

This summer, I am the development intern for the Pennsylvania Innocence Project (PIP) in Philadelphia. The PIP is a legal nonprofit that works to exonerate those convicted of crimes that they did not commit and to prevent wrongful convictions of innocent people.

I had heard about the Innocence Project before, most notably from its work with Steven Avery and the Netflix series Making a Murderer. The Innocence Project has revolutionized the criminal justice system in using DNA testing to exonerate the wrongfully convicted. In Pennsylvania alone there have been 57 exonerations since 1989 — four through PIP since its office was established in 2009 — with a total of 576.6 years lost by clients.

As the sole development intern at the PIP, I help to manage all marketing, communications, and advertising projects that arise. My responsibilities, therefore, vary greatly from day to day. In the few short weeks that I have been here, I have crafted graphics and marketing materials for fundraisers; managed social media accounts; built part of the website; created a Wikipedia page for our branch; written e-mails that were sent to 10,000+ supporters; and drafted press releases. On June 27, I was given the honor of drafting the official press release announcing the release of exonerated PIP client Crystal Weimer.

One of the most moving jobs that I have been involved with is helping a former client, Kenneth Granger, with his personal campaign for reintegration after he was wrongly imprisoned for 28 years. I work with Granger on a day-to-day basis, and I have found our interactions transformative, as they show me the current faults that exist in our criminal justice system. My interactions with Granger have also taught me that people who have been wrongly imprisoned in Pennsylvania receive no compensation from the state, a fact that I found startling.

I feel that I am making a difference in the world with the work that I have been a part of this summer, and it has helped me to narrow down what exactly I would like to do after graduating from Colgate. As I enter my junior year at Colgate, I know that I will take advantage of available resources to enable myself to potentially pursue a career in humanitarian law.

Internships from Career Services
The Center for Outreach and Volunteerism at Colgate
Summer internship blog series: 4th down and 24 hours to go


Summer internship blog series: 4th down and 24 hours to go

July 7, 2016
Jacob King '18 in the lab.

Jacob King ’18 in the lab at Colgate

Colgate students have fanned out across the globe to apply their liberal arts know-how in a variety of real-world settings. They are writing back to keep our community posted on their progress. This article was written by Jacob King ’18, a molecular biology major from Burlington, Conn.

This summer, I’m on campus completing research with biology professor Krista Ingram. Professor Ingram is a leading researcher on circadian rhythms — physical, psychological, and behavioral patterns that roughly follow a 24-hour cycle in humans.

These rhythms influence important aspects of life, like sleep-wake cycles and hormone release. Researchers have also found a correlation between abnormal circadian rhythms and health issues like obesity, cancer, and psychological disorders.

When Chloe Weiss ’18, Celine Marlin Andrews ’18, and I walked into the lab on our first day, we had no idea what to expect. Unlike some research interns, we began at square one, learning about the current findings in the field in order to form a hypothesis that had not already been addressed. We decided that we want to see how student-athletes’ circadian rhythms could influence their performance, both physically and academically.

Our schedule consists of two types of days. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, we do sampling on human participants: the football players who are on campus for the summer. We have the players complete a physical and cognitive task for us, then collect biological markers, which are physical measurements of effort. In our study, we look at heart rate and a stress hormone found in saliva.

The second type of day occurs on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays and consists of mostly processing the saliva we collected, taking the raw data from participants’ task scores, and correlating their performance with their circadian rhythm by looking at the expression levels of certain clock genes.

Clock genes are a set of genes that influence the body’s ability to cycle within 24 hours. Measuring their expression involves looking at the subject’s RNA; the more RNA a subject has at a certain time of day, the more the gene is being expressed.

Then, we have the participants complete a survey that asks about certain daily routines and sleeping habits and allows us to predict what type of rhythm they have.

We have been able work through every aspect of a researcher’s life and get to see the results within the same summer, which is incredible. We hope to have our research published in the months ahead.

Going into my junior year at Colgate, I can easily say that I will be looking into research after I graduate.


Summer internship blog series: recipe for business at Chicory

Summer internship blog series: fighting frontotemporal degeneration

Growing hope

July 5, 2016

Sunrise Camp residents wave from the window of their new treehouse

Caroline Danehy ’19 never expected to appear on national television. But a stroke of inspiration at a special summer camp offered her the chance to make an appearance on the Animal Planet series Treehouse Masters.

Two years ago, Danehy, then a junior in high school, decided to spend a summer day volunteering at Sunrise Day Camp in Pearl River, N.Y. The camp, one of six Sunrise camps located worldwide, cares for children with cancer, providing a refuge in nature for them and their families, and offering fun and healing away from lonely hospitals and painful treatments.

“It’s such a good thing for the kids,” Danehy said. “They’re in a place now where they don’t have to be worried about doctors or medicine, and they can just be kids and have fun. It’s taking them out of the hospital and into nature, which is such a healing environment.”

It was this unencumbered view of nature that first struck Danehy upon her arrival at the Pearl River camp. Specifically, she remembers the multitude of trees, which brought to her a sudden inspiration.

“I was reminded of earlier that morning when I had been watching the show Treehouse Masters, and I just thought of what an amazing place this would be for a treehouse,” Danehy said.


A room with a view, brought to Sunrise by Caroline Danehy (center) with Arnie Preminger (right) and Pete Nelson (left)

After approaching camp management for the green light on the project, Danehy took action, first reaching out to a local construction company to ask for a donation of one of their treehouses. When they were unable to provide one, she turned to the very people who inspired the project, the team at Treehouse Masters. Danehy sent an e-mail to the show’s casting director, never expecting to receive a response.

“But sure enough,” she said, “I got an e-mail back saying they loved this idea, and they wanted to set up a meeting with me and Arnie Preminger [the director of the Sunrise Foundation].”

From then on, Danehy acted as a liaison between the camp and the show’s production team, and after a casting call, she was chosen to appear in the episode for an interview with Preminger and Pete Nelson, the show’s host.

But Danehy’s involvement with the project didn’t end on screen. She also organized a fundraiser with her school’s lacrosse team to raise approximately $2,000 toward the nearly $200,000 in funds needed to build the wheelchair-accessible structure complete with a peek-a-boo roof and plenty of room for games and activities.

On June 21, 2015, Danehy’s dream came to fruition when camera crews filmed the reveal of the treehouse to the eager campers waiting below. Nearly a year later, on June 2, 2016, she received the Sunrise Champion Award at the Sunrise Association’s Third Annual Dare to Dream Benefit recognizing all of her hard work in bringing the treehouse to life.

Danehy’s commitment to activism has only grown since attending Colgate. In 2015, she and her brother, Jake Danehy ’16, pitched their idea for Fair Harbor Clothing at Colgate’s Entrepreneur Weekend, gaining $5,000 in funding. Their business sells environmentally sustainable beachwear, including board shorts crafted from recycled plastic bottles.

Max A. Shacknai Center for Outreach, Volunteerism, and Education (COVE)
Fair Harbor

Picture this: science at Colgate

July 1, 2016

First place winner by Claire Kittock ’17 and Noor Anvery ’17

Veins of neon green trace a path across a stark black background in a photo taken by Claire Kittock ’17 and Noor Anvery ’17, displaying a web of microscopic neurons within the brain of a genetically altered fruit fly.

Kittock and Anvery captured the photo through a microscope while researching the cellular architecture of different animals with Mala Misra, assistant professor of biology. The photo later earned first place in the Cooley Science Library’s first ever photo contest.

Kristi Mangine, Colgate’s science library coordinator, thought of the idea for the contest because she wanted to decorate the library’s bare walls and was inspired by several student workers whom she knew were passionate about photography.

“The student photographers have great perspectives on what’s going on around campus,” Mangine noted. “So I thought a photo contest would be great to highlight how [the students] see science at Colgate.”

Second place by Geology professor William Peck

In early February, Mangine and Peter Tagtmeyer, associate science librarian, e-mailed students, faculty, and members of the Colgate community asking for photos that represented their vision of “science at Colgate.”

After receiving 30 photo submissions, Mangine turned again to the community, this time for a vote to determine the six winners whose photos would be placed on permanent display in the library.

The winning photographs varied widely in subjects, techniques, and fields of study.

Geology professor William Peck’s jewel-toned photomicrograph of a moon rock took second place in the contest. The rock was collected by the Apollo 12 mission to Oceanus Procellarum in 1969. Peck receives a set of lunar samples from NASA every spring for use in his Geology 202 class, and this year’s sample, Lunar Basalt 12005, contained minerals that settled out of the moon’s lava lake approximately 3 billion years ago.

Third place by Leda Rosenthal ’18

In third place was a portrait of an inquisitive dairy cow snapped by Leda Rosenthal ’18. Rosenthal’s photo came from her time spent at the Durfee dairy farm in Chittenango, N.Y., where she worked as an agricultural economic fellow for Colgate’s Upstate Institute last summer.

Mangine noted that the contest had the added benefit of exposing little-known research projects on campus. “That’s the thing about Colgate,” she said. “There’s such amazing research going on behind closed doors. This contest lets you see it.”

Summer internship blog series: recipe for business at Chicory

June 30, 2016

Erica Pais ’17 at Chicory headquarters in New York City with founder Joey Petracca ’13

Colgate students have fanned out across the globe to apply their liberal arts know-how in a variety of real-world settings. They are writing back to campus to keep our community posted on their progress. This article was written by Erica Pais ’17, a sociology and educational studies double major from Sharon, Mass., interning at Chicory — a startup launched by Yuni Sameshima ’13 and Joey Petracca ’13. 

This May, I moved to New York City to work as a marketing intern at Chicory. Chicory makes recipes shoppable by connecting recipe websites with online grocers, allowing consumers to have their ingredients delivered. At Colgate, I’m a member of Thought Into Action, which inspired me to intern at a startup and also put me in touch with Chicory’s founders, who mentor through TIA and are Colgate alumni. I’m an avid baker and cook, so I was thrilled to find a company that has food at the forefront of its mission.

As part of the Marketing Team, I help manage all social media outlets, including Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We use social media to promote our food bloggers and our own written content, as well as to create a community among our recipe partners. I also contribute to the company blog and create weekly e-mail newsletter content.

Now that I’ve been here for four weeks, I’ve learned that marketing is about a lot more than just posting on social media. Our team actively pursues potential recipe partners while maintaining relationships with current partners. Chicory pays attention to detail and ensures that our partners feel a personal connection to the company.

With only seven full-time employees in our office, Chicory is a small company, and I’m able to interact with everyone on a daily basis. The company culture is fun and friendly, but professional at the same time. Chicory has struck a nice balance on that front. I love that the whole team eats lunch together every day to catch up and check in with one another. We even have a Ping-Pong table in the office. All of the employees are amazing players, so they are collectively training me!

Being a small startup, Chicory is the perfect place to learn about many aspects of a company. I have been offered opportunities to participate in sales calls and even to learn about how our technology works. Working at Chicory has been a fantastic experience, reaffirming my passion for working in a food-related field.

Although I don’t know exactly what career I hope to pursue, being here has shed light on multiple possibilities. Going into senior year, I’m still figuring it out, but am sure I will find my way. I look forward to learning more throughout the rest of my internship!


Erica Pais ’17 on making connections through baking

Summer internship blog series: fighting frontotemporal degeneration

Summer internship blog series: Greening Glimmerglass

June 16, 2016
Grace Thomas ’17 stands with Bob Sutherland outside of a barn at Mohican Farms

Grace Thomas ’17 with Bob Sutherland of Mohican Farms (Photo by Karli Cadel)

Colgate students have fanned out across the globe to apply their liberal arts know-how in a variety of real-world settings. They are writing back to campus to keep our community posted on their progress. This article was written by Grace Thomas ’17, interning at the Glimmerglass Festival, where Francesca Zambello ’78, H’12 serves as artistic and general director.

I am fortunate to be working this summer as a member of the Summer Field School within the Upstate Institute, pursuing my interests in environmental sustainability.

This opportunity blends academic research with a more traditional working setting. My goals for the summer are to assess and advise the staff at the internationally famous Glimmerglass Festival in Cooperstown, N.Y., on a variety of sustainable initiatives, from water use to energy efficiency, with a host of projects in between.

Read more

Summer internship blog series: Tips from career services director Teresa Olsen

June 10, 2016
Kevin Costello ’16 hands a file across a desk in the office of Congressman Richard Hanna

Last summer, Kevin Costello ’16 worked as an intern for Congressman Richard Hanna on Capitol Hill after participating in Colgate’s Washington, D.C., study group. (Photo by Kanji Takeno)

As we get ready to kick off Colgate’s annual summer internship blog series, which will highlight students at work in a variety of fields around the globe, we’re featuring internship advice from a WalletHub interview with Teresa Olsen, assistant vice president of institutional advancement and director of career services. Read more

An immersion in public arts and humanities

June 8, 2016
group portrait of students, faculty, and alumni standing on the Highline in New York City

(L to R) FRONT: Bonnie Zhou ’18, Chelsea Mohr ’17, Jane Trask ’16, Kate Dugdale ’16, Monica Hoh ’16 MIDDLE: Elizabeth Johnson ’16, Woohee Kim ’18, Miranda Gilgore ’18, Emily Wong 18, Professor Claire Baldwin, Jason Alexander ’17, Bennie Guzman ’17 BACK: Julia Wolf ’17, Jim Smith ’70, Robert Dorf ’80, Professor Georgia Frank (photo by: a kind stranger on the Highline)

Editor’s note: Last spring, Miranda Gilgore ’18 took part in Colgate’s public arts and humanities immersion trip to New York City. As she prepares for her summer months as a camp counselor in the Adirondacks, Gilgore reflected on the experience and how it has changed her outlook on her majors, her hobbies, and her long-term career planning.

A marble-tiled museum, a pretty show with nice music and gorgeous costumes, an old house that used to belong to a wealthy family. That’s what a lot of people would probably think of when they heard a definition of ‘public humanities,’ the work of individuals and organizations to provide community access to the arts, history, philosophy, and more.

I did, too, before going on the public arts and humanities immersion trip to New York City, sponsored by Jim Smith ’70 and Robert Dorf ’80, during Spring Break 2016. From March 13 to 16, I traveled with 11 other Colgate students and two professors to NYC in order to bridge the gap between our academic experiences in the humanities and the “real world.” Prior to departure, we had a seminar class to discuss articles and case studies regarding nonprofits related to the arts and humanities, and we also met to discuss trip logistics.

Thinking deeply about dance performances, museum exhibitions, archive center holdings, theater performances — all of which we did in fact deeply engage in during the trip — opened up the doors to some amazing discoveries.

Read more

Class of 2016 commencement address

May 15, 2016

(Editor’s note: Robert D. Manfred Jr. P’16, the commissioner of Major League Baseball, delivered the following address to the Colgate University Class of 2016 on May 15, 2016.)

Good morning everyone. It is an honor and a pleasure for me to be here today.  I grew up just down the road in Rome, N.Y.. And, from a very early age, I can remember being impressed by the quality and prestige of this great university.  I am grateful to acting President Harsin and the trustees of the university for bestowing on me an honorary degree and for inviting me to speak here today.

Robert D. Manfred Jr. P’16

Robert D. Manfred Jr. P’16

As honored as I am, we all know that the real stars of today’s activities are the members of the Class of 2016. So, let me say early and often, congratulations to each and every one of you. As some of you may know, my wife, Colleen, and I have a very special bond with and affection for one member of this great class, our youngest daughter, Mary Clare. Mary Clare has had a wonderful experience here at Colgate. Colleen and I — and indeed our whole family — have had the pleasure of getting to know MC’s whole “posse”: Katie, Molly, Hannah, Sarah, and Jess as well as their families. During their time here at Colgate, we’ve had dinners and parties together here in Hamilton and have even taken vacations together. Our whole family has been enriched by these experiences.

Personally, my favorite enrichment experience was the lacrosse party that we attended last fall. I enjoyed my introduction to Keystone Light, the worst beer ever brewed. And, it’s very amusing to watch what can safely be characterized as “oldies” (people like me) trying to relive their youth by playing beer pong.

Sometimes graduates feel a sense of sadness on a day like today because the college experience is so great, and there is a lurking fear that they will be moving on from their college friends. I will let the Class of 2016 in on a little secret that may ease your concerns in this regard. You never really move on from your college friends. You may be separated by circumstances and distance, but the bonds that you formed in this great environment, during a unique period of maturation, will hold you together. Even if you see your college friends infrequently, you will find that the fondness and familiarity will return quickly. And, when you need friends the most, the first ones to show up will be your Colgate friends.

Friends and family are often mentioned in the same breath. So let me also say a word about family. A college experience at an institution like Colgate is a privilege. Very few of you could have enjoyed that privilege without the support of your families, and often that support involved sacrifice by your parents.  Please take a minute today and let your parents — or whoever supported you during your time at Colgate — know how much you appreciate their support. It will mean the world to them.

Commencement addresses are about looking forward. So, enough about college and how great it has been. It is time now to look forward to what is next. In looking ahead I am going to take advantage of my position just a bit. While I certainly have some thoughts of my own, I am also going to draw on the wisdom of some great baseball philosophers in the hope that I can offer the graduates some advice that will be useful in the transition to independence.

A major portion of the rest of your life will be devoted to work. But that does not have to be bad news. Work can be enjoyable and fulfilling if you can find a career about which you are passionate. Most jobs require a genuine effort. Most jobs require a sacrifice. And, most jobs, at least occasionally, produce stress and frustration. The effort, the sacrifice, the stress, and the frustration are much easier if your work involves something about which you are passionate. Even more important, if you are passionate about your work, your successes will be all that much more valuable to you.

A second crucial ingredient to job satisfaction is collegiality. A little collegiality produces a better work environment, better results, and more satisfaction.

Collegiality is a group effort. Leaders should make an effort to create an atmosphere of collegiality, but that effort will only be successful if the others in the workplace, no matter their position, participate as well. Everyone should make an effort to be inclusive and encourage a free exchange of ideas at work. Interact positively with your co-workers, recognize their accomplishments, and be generous with praise for praise-worthy efforts. Over time, you will find that your co-workers will become supporters and allies in your effort to move ahead professionally.

I would be remiss if I did not mention a concept with which I have struggled throughout my career: work-life balance. I have been in the workforce for 33 years. I have been lucky. Today, I have what I regard to be the best job in the world. But even before I became commissioner, I had great jobs that allowed me to interact with very successful and interesting people: a federal judge, partners in a great law firm, and dynamic leaders in the sports industry.

In my 33 years, I have unfortunately seen the careers of some talented people come to unhappy endings. Almost without exception those unhappy endings occurred with people who became completely wrapped up in their careers to the point that they seemed to lose their identities independent of their jobs. It would be as if I thought of myself as the commissioner of baseball rather than as Rob Manfred, whose job (I might add temporarily) happens to be as the commissioner of baseball.

This loss of identity is symptomatic, in my view, of an improper work-life balance. People become so engrossed in their careers that family, friends, and outside interests, the things that really matter, fall by the wayside. And, the myopic focus on work can rob people of objectivity and judgment. These people who lose their sense of self — independent of their title — become so obsessed with keeping their jobs that they lose their ability to do their jobs effectively. Ironically, this obsession with work all too often leads to failure at work.

Obviously, you have to pay attention to your career and strive to be successful. It is equally important, however, to focus on family, non-work interests, and the community in which you live. This broader focus will make you better and more effective in the workplace and happier in your life as a whole.

So, now let’s turn to one of my favorite topics, baseball, for a few short minutes. What do some baseball greats have to offer by way of advice to you as graduates?

Lou Brock is a Hall of Famer who played his best years with the St. Louis Cardinals. He was known for his speed and daring on the base paths, which disrupted opponents with amazing regularity. Lou Brock once said, “Show me a guy who’s afraid to look bad, and I’ll show you a guy I can beat every day.”

As Lou correctly points out, life is a risk reward business. If you are not willing to take the occasional — and well thought out — risk, you will never reach your full potential. Be smart. Be analytical. Use good judgment. But, don’t forget to be bold. Think big thoughts, and set high goals. If you follow this advice, you will have far fewer regrets when you reach my age than if you don’t.

Joe Torre is, of course, the Hall of Fame manager of the New York Yankees. I am also proud to say he is a colleague and a friend. Joe once said, “Hitting home runs and all that other good stuff is not enough; it is how you handle yourself in all the good times, and the bad times, that matters.”

There are two great messages in that one short sentence. First, it is a skill to handle success with grace. You all have received the gift of a great education and will enjoy many successes in your lives. With each success, take a moment, draw a breath, and think about humility. If you take quiet pride in your accomplishments and project a sense of humility, others will welcome the opportunity to celebrate your success, making that success all the sweeter.

The second lesson relates to the bad times. People often say that one of the great virtues of baseball is that it teaches young people important lessons, the most important of which is the ability to overcome failure. Think about it; even the best Major League player fails two out of three times when he comes to the plate. Yet, those players, over and over again, regroup, learn from their failures, and figure out a way to be more successful in the next at bat. When you fail, and all of us do, embrace the failure, figure out why it happened, learn from your mistakes, and recommit yourself to finding success.

Finally, the most important baseball player that ever lived was Jackie Robinson. He may not have been the best player, but he certainly had the greatest and most lasting effect on American society. Jackie broke the color barrier in baseball and helped fuel a revolution in America that changed our collective view of race relations. He began a process that led to a national debate over race relations that continues to this day. And, in the course of it, he endured indignities, hardship, and hatred always with dignity.

As you might expect, Jackie Robinson once uttered words that I believe teach the most important lesson of all. Jackie said, “A life is not important except in the impact that it has on other lives.” In a society that focuses on immediate self-gratification, these words may seem anachronistic. But in actuality they are timeless. They are reflective of a fundamental tenet of every major religion, namely the need to help others and treat them with respect.

I must confess, I do not remember a single thing about the commencement address at my college graduation 36 years ago. I spent a bunch of time on Google, and I can’t even find who gave the address. I hope from this address you will remember at least one thing. Jackie Robinson was right. You will all have busy and successful lives. Please find room and time in those busy lives to positively impact the lives of others. Engage in your community, and provide service to others. Be generous with your wealth, and try to help those that are less fortunate. At the end of the day, what you do for others is what really matters.

Congratulations to the Class of 2016.

Related links:
In photos: commencement weekend
LGBTQ advocate wins 1819 Award
In video: campus from above

Senior Reflection: Kalani Byrd ’16

May 12, 2016

Name: Kalani Byrd

Hometown: Los Angeles, Calif.

Major/Minor: Peace & Conflict Studies/Psychology

Campus activities:

Research assistant for Professor Jennifer Tomlinson in the psychology department
Student caller for the Office of the Annual Fund
Student employee in the merchandising department of the Colgate Bookstore
Member of Kappa Kappa Gamma with service on its philanthropy committee
Vice president of Colgate’s Panhellenic Council

Portrait of Kalani Byrd ’16

Kalani Byrd ’16

I want people to see … that a first-generation woman of color can be successful at Colgate. It was a blessing for me to have the opportunity to attend this university, and I did everything I could to reap the benefits, enjoy my time here, and set myself up for future success. Colgate is such a generous place, and you definitely can find the right people here to help you do well and support you along the way. I also want to leave people understanding that, despite some flaws in the system, there can be a place for women of color in Greek Life at Colgate, seeing as I have had such a positive experience and have found some of my best friends through it.

I hope I leave people with … an understanding that you do not have to study something “mainstream” or “expected” to be successful. You should absolutely only do what you want to do. I started out on the pre-med track and changed to peace and conflict studies, because it’s what I truly loved studying — and I still have a great job lined up after I graduate!

OUS has … tremendously impacted my time here at Colgate. Although I was annoyed back then to be spending my last summer before college taking classes here, I’ve come to realize that it was all totally worth it. The experience of those two classes really prepared me for Colgate’s academic challenges. Having a family of faculty and professors whom I can go to when I need literally anything at all has been invaluable. Some of my very best friends — friends I know I will be with for life — I also found from that summer and OUS. These are memories and people that are going to be with me for a lifetime, and for that, I am forever grateful.

Colgate hosts 73rd professional network event

April 29, 2016
Panelists on stage discussing the changing media landscape with Jeff Fager '77, executive producer of 60 Minutes.

Panelists discuss the changing media landscape with Jeff Fager ’77, executive producer of 60 Minutes. (Photo by Lorenzo Ciniglio)

Colgate University launched its professional networks to promote alumni engagement, cultivate new professional opportunities for members, and support undergraduate career development. Since then, thousands of alumni, parents, and students have engaged with professional networks by attending online, regional, and on-campus events.

Colgate launched the new Marketing, Media, and Communications Network and brought alumni, parents, and students together to discuss the state of journalism in the digital world — the professional network program’s 73rd event.

Jeff Fager ’77, executive producer of 60 Minutes, moderated a panel of alumni and parents that featured Joey Bartolomeo ’95, executive editor, SeventeenDina Dunn ’88, P’19 founder and general manager, Blink, LLC (and Thought Into Action mentor); Andrew Heyward P’00, faculty associate at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and principal at Heyward Advisory LLC; Todd Larsen ’88, chief executive officer, Blurb, Inc.; and John Martin ’84, managing director, NASCAR Digital Media.

Students who attended the event were able to hear from seasoned communications professionals and network with an even broader range of people.

Alumni talking

Alumni make connections at the Colgate Professional Networks’ 73rd event. (Photo by Lorenzo Ciniglio)

“I really enjoyed attending the marketing, media, and communications launch because of the emphasis the panelists placed on creating and building your own personal brand,” said Kerry Houston ’16. “I found their experiences and insight on this constantly changing and evolving industry to be very helpful in learning how to successfully market myself and my skills.”

The 10 different professional networks offer students (and parents) a chance to glimpse a roadmap to a desired career and learn from smart alumni about topics specific to their industry. They also allow alumni to network together.

“Every Colgate grad knows the power of our network, but to see it in action is palpable,” said Sian-Pierre Regis ’06. “Some of the biggest names in media showed up to the MMC event, dropping serious knowledge on the shifting state of the industry — to be able to get intel and then dive deeper in follow-up conversations is invaluable.”

While this event was a panel discussion, many professional networking events are not. Online events like the one on Colgate Day, are an opportunity for alumni to connect with each other wherever they live and work. On-campus events like SophoMORE Connections connect alumni, faculty, and students. For a list of upcoming events, visit colgate.edu/networks.

Related links:
Watch the entire Marketing, Media & Communications panel discussion
Attend the Colgate Day online networking event
See all of Colgate’s Professional Networks
Watch the Law and Finance summit

LGBTQ advocate wins 1819 Award

April 26, 2016
Portrait of Providence Ryan ’16, winner of the 1819 Award

Providence Ryan ’16, winner of the 1819 Award. (Photo by Brian Ness)

An exemplary student and a fierce advocate for LGBTQ awareness and promoting positive sexuality, Providence A. Ryan ’16, a biology and philosophy double major from Schenectady, N.Y., is the 2016 recipient of Colgate’s highest student honor, the 1819 Award.

The 1819 Award is given annually to one student representing character, sportsmanship, scholarship, and service above and beyond their peers.

Read more

Syllabus: “Horror” and the American Horror Film

April 25, 2016
Campus at night

Photo by Andrew Daddio

Editor’s note: Wondering what’s happening in the classroom at Colgate? Here’s a real-time glimpse into academic life on campus — a syllabus from a course underway this semester.

FMST 352 “Horror” and the American Horror Film
Kevin Wynter, visiting assistant professor of Film & Media Studies
TR 2:45–4:00, 105 Little Hall

Course description:

This course examines some the key factors that have contributed to the horror genre’s capacity to maintain its continued viability in popular culture across a wide range of media including graphic novels, video art, and interactive gaming.

Beginning with the modern period of the American horror film and then expanding beyond its physical and ideological borders, this course is designed to encourage students to challenge the ideas that have become associated with the term “horror,” and to consider whether some other term or terms may be better suited to describe the types of feelings horror films and related forms of media actually inspire.

The following questions will be considered: What is horror? Do horror-genre films truly inspire horror or are we, as participants, moved by some other affect or response? Is it possible to locate cinematic representations of horror and its experience outside of the horror genre?


Course readings include Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ Watchmen, Mark Seltzer’s Serial Killers: Death and Life in America’s Wound Culture, and various articles.

Key assignments/activities:

Coursework includes keeping a nightmare journal, in which students are asked to describe an “especially potent nightmare” that they have had and to consider it in relation to horror films screened in class. The class also requires students to present on class readings and write a short essay about Watchmen. The final paper, meant to take into account all that was explored over the course of semester, has the option of taking the shape of a video essay.

Class format:

In addition to weekly meetings, there is a film screening on Thursday nights, 7–10 p.m. Students are expected to complete all reading assignments and come to class prepared to raise points of interest or difficulty. Attendance and class participation are crucial and will be taken into consideration when calculating the final grade.

The professor says:

After taking this course, you will never look at horror movies the same way. One of the learning goals I propose is to try to distinguish feelings of terror from feelings of horror, and to interrogate how horror movies really make us feel. What students soon come to learn is that the feeling of horror is not confined to the genre conventions they have become familiar with, but can be found with more intensity in films outside of the horror genre.

Related links:
Zombie film Here Alone by Rod Blackhurst ’02 takes home Tribeca’s Audience Award for Best Narrative Feature

Syllabus: Silent Warfare

April 21, 2016
Persson Hall

Photo by Andrew Daddio

Editor’s note: Wondering what’s happening in the classroom at Colgate? Here’s a real-time glimpse into academic life on campus — a syllabus from a course underway this semester.

POSC 390 Silent Warfare: Intelligence Analysis and Statecraft
Danielle Lupton, Assistant Professor of Political Science
MW 1:20-2:35, Persson 133

Course Description:
This course introduces students to the complex and crucial process of obtaining, analyzing, and producing intelligence in the making of American foreign policy. We cover subjects including problems with the structure of the intelligence community, covert action, psychological and bureaucratic constraints on analysts and policy makers, and how the intelligence community has responded to key threats. This course also explores the ethical issues raised by intelligence gathering, such as the use of enhanced interrogation techniques, the role of whistleblowers, and accountability of the intelligence community.

Key assignments/activities:
There are three central written assignments. The first is an analysis of an intelligence agency, where students identify challenges facing an agency and provide solutions. The second is an active learning assignment in which students conduct research on themselves based on publicly available data and write a report regarding the ethics of open-source intelligence based on their findings. The final paper for this course is an in-depth investigation into a major intelligence failure, its causes, and ways to prevent such failures in the future.

The main text will be Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy (6th Edition) by Mark Lowenthal.

The professor says:
“Students will gain a deeper understanding of the inter-workings of foreign policy by analyzing the value of information and how it supports the policy process. We engage with critical issues that affect not only policy makers, but also each of us as individuals, such as the use of drones to combat terrorism, the rise of increased domestic surveillance, and the ethics of enhanced interrogation techniques.

“In class, we focus our discussion on dissecting problems facing the intelligence community as well as providing solutions to those problems. Using this problem-based approach, students can apply the skills developed through course discussions and written work to any area of analysis in the future.”

Hannah Bercovici ’17 reports from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

April 4, 2016
Research vessel Atlantis sits beside a dock

Research vessel Atlantis ready to cruise atop the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (photo by Maris Wicks)

Editor’s note: Hannah Bercovici ’17, a geology major from Woodbridge, Conn., is the only undergraduate member of the science party aboard the research vessel Atlantis, currently cruising over the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, somewhere around the 14th parallel north. Bercovici and her colleagues from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution are hunting for seafloor basalt — “popping rocks” that could give insights into the volatile (gaseous) composition of Earth’s mantle. We asked Hannah to give us a snapshot of her life on Atlantis, and she obliged with this note to the Colgate community.

On board, the day starts at every hour.

One person will be eating breakfast as another is settling in for bed, and you get that mid-afternoon feeling at 2 a.m. because you’ve only been awake since 8 p.m. As a member of the science party, I’ve gotten pretty lucky with my sleep schedule. While in transit from Bridgetown, Barbados, to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, I was on the 8–12 watch. I would wake up at 8 a.m. and work until 12 p.m., and then have eight hours off.

Read more

Konosioni to hold 19th annual auction on April 8

April 4, 2016
From travel aficionados to baseball fans to supporters of the local food movement, bidders showed their spirit at the 16th-annual Konosioni Charity Auction. The senior honor society’s largest annual public event — whose theme this year was “’Tis the Spirit that is Colgate” —raised $20,000 that will be used to give funding to local nonprofit organizations in Madison County. Items for the auction, which was held on Friday, April 12 at the Palace Theater, were donated by local businesses and Colgate students, parents, professors, and alumni. The wide variety of offerings ranged from gift baskets, handmade crafts, and jewelry to yard work and other services, dates with Konosioni members, and a Common Thread Community Farm Share. Among the big-ticket items were a weeklong stay at a Paris apartment and seats at several New York Mets, Yankees, and Boston Red Sox games. In the hours before the auction, Konosioni held a Spirit Festival that showcased student and local talent, with performances at various locations across campus and in downtown Hamilton. The festival was meant to demonstrate not only the Colgate spirit but also that of the surrounding community, said Konosioni member David Esber ’13, through the participation of residents, and local business owners. The Konosioni Charity Auction raises funds to be distributed to nonprofit organizations in Madison County.

The Konosioni Charity Auction raises funds to be distributed to nonprofit organizations in Madison County.

The Konosioni Senior Honor Society will host its 19th annual charity auction on April 8 at 8 p.m. in the Hall of Presidents. Proceeds from the auction will benefit nonprofit organizations in upstate New York via Madison County Gives.

Konosioni is excited to welcome alumni, Colgate community members, and residents from the area to this event. Items of all kinds, from vacation escapes in Jackson Hole, Wyo., to baseball tickets and home-cooked meals, are available for bidding. The $25,000 raised during last year’s auction benefited a diverse group of seven charitable organizations, reaching a wide group of needs and populations throughout Madison County.

Read more

Colgate students teach coding at local elementary school

March 18, 2016
Colgate Women in Computer Science students help teach coding to local elementary school students.

Samantha Braver ’18 helps teach computer coding at Hamilton Central School as a member of the Colgate Women in Computer Science club. (Photo by Andrew Daddio)

Little fingers tapped away at computer keys after school at Hamilton Central School (HCS) on a recent sunny afternoon, but instead of manipulating blocks in Minecraft or posting to Facebook, they were busy writing computer code.

The afternoon coding class for students in grades three through five is the creation of Colgate’s Women in Computer Science club, whose members decided to share the skills learned in their college classrooms with the eager elementary school students.

Read more

English department hosts Miltonathon

March 18, 2016
The serpent cake the English department served during Miltonathon.

Let them eat snake: English department serves a serpent-shaped cake during its Miltonathon

On Sunday, March 6, the English department hosted a live reading of the epic poem Paradise Lost, by John Milton.

Volunteers sat around the big oval table in the Fager Lounge and read the more than 10,000 lines from 12 books.

“The Miltonathon, which began last year, is a tribute to my late friend and colleague Professor George Hudson, who taught Milton at Colgate for over forty years,” said Professor Deborah Knuth Kleck, who now teaches the Milton course at Colgate, and started this event.

Marathon readings of Paradise Lost at other colleges exist, but Kunth Kleck has never heard of one that has the reader play parts. Participants at Colgate divided up roles as they read, so sometimes the narrator had only a couple of words — like “she said” — before a speech resumed. “Professor Judith Oliver, emerita professor of art and art history, for example, got to be God!” reported Kunth Kleck.

The day included a snake cake (pictured above, designed and executed by local baker Sharon Stevens) and live tweeting on Colgate’s Twitter feed. Every tweet was written by English major Emily Daniel ’18.

See all the posts below, including a video by Lizzie Souter ’16 and revised for 2016 by Dylann McLaughlin ’18.​

Read more