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Internship blog series: asking important questions

August 29, 2016
Angelica Greco '18, left, and Julia Feikens stand in front of

Angelica Greco, left, and Julia Feikens in the city of Oswego, where they conducted interviews.

During the summer months, Colgate students fanned out across the globe to apply their liberal arts know-how in a variety of real-world settings. They wrote back to campus to keep our community posted on their progress. Angelica Greco ’18, from Bethesda, Md., and Julia Feikens ’18, from West Nyack, N.Y., described their travels through upstate New York as they investigated the closure of nuclear power plants.

Our research this summer tied into a larger question that our mentor, Professor Dai Yamamoto, has been studying: how does the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant impact the community that hosts it?

With Professor Yamamoto on sabbatical in Japan, we planned, organized, and carried out independent research focusing specifically on the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Plant, located in Scriba, N.Y., half an hour away from Hamilton.

The FitzPatrick plant, having been unprofitable for the past few years, was scheduled for decommissioning in January of 2017.

For this summer’s research, we gathered qualitative, on-site data by interviewing stakeholders in Scriba and Oswego County. We interviewed people involved in local government and school systems to give us a picture of how the plant’s closure would affect the community from a variety of perspectives.

The picture that emerged during interviews was what we expected: the loss of the FitzPatrick plant would have a serious impact on many parts of the community. In addition to employing 615 people in a county that already struggles with high unemployment and poverty rates, the plant contributes vital revenue to the local school districts, the Scriba town government, and Oswego County.

But getting the information we needed and reaching the heart of the matter wasn’t always easy for us. Having to plan and conduct interviews by ourselves meant that both of us had to sharpen our interview skills. Banal “how do you feel about that?” questions just didn’t cut it this summer.

We asked interviewees about the future — were they optimistic about Scriba and Oswego County? Would the loss of the FitzPatrick plant, a large, well-paying employer, devastate the community? Were people worried about how the decommissioning of FitzPatrick will affect the programs in the local school system or access to municipal services?

The responses fell all across the spectrum: while interviewees were worried about their community’s future, many were also optimistic. People were hopeful that revenue from the Novelis aluminum plant and the two other nuclear power facilities in the area would be able to help make up for the loss of FitzPatrick. Participants were also optimistic about a government plan to subsidize FitzPatrick and other struggling nuclear plants. The subsidies may be enough to keep the plant open.

We learned that the overall situation was more complicated than we initially anticipated. However, this offered us more opportunities to learn about the different dynamics of communities that interact with nuclear decommissioning.

While growing our connections in the area, we also learned more about how nuclear plants affect far more than economies in an area. They aid in social events and support local organizations with time and effort. In order to create a whole picture of Oswego County, it was necessary to learn as much as possible about each facet. Consequently, our research and perspectives improved drastically by looking at every angle the plant’s relationship with the county.

Many of the issues that we asked participants about are delicate, and being caring, sympathetic listeners was very important. While we started this summer with varying levels of interview experience, we both undoubtedly grew as interviewers and researchers.

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Summer internship blog series: little dogs living longer

Career Services: Summer internship funding

Colgate University Center for Career Services

 


Summer internship blog series: little dogs living longer

August 11, 2016
Colgate students have fanned out across the globe to apply their liberal arts know-how in a variety of real-world settings. They are writing back to campus to keep our community posted on their progress. Josh Winward ’18, from Scarsdale, N.Y., wrote about his research.
portrait of Josh Winward ’18

Josh Winward ’18

I am on campus conducting research with Professor Ana Jimenez on the effects of oxidative stress, which scientists believe is one of the leading causes of aging in animals. This is a fairly new topic of study, because scientists did not connect oxidative stress to aging until the late 2000s.

Oxidative stress deals with the balance between pro-oxidants — molecules that damage cells and membranes — and antioxidants, which stop damage. Both are produced during cellular respiration, the main mechanism by which bodies turn food into energy. When the process works correctly, it produces antioxidants, but less than 2 percent of the time it produces pro-oxidants instead.

Our research deals with oxidative stress and aging in dogs. Small dogs tend to live longer than large dogs, even though small dogs have slower metabolic rates and in almost every other mammalian species, animals with slower metabolism have shorter lifespans than animals with faster rates. We believe oxidative stress is behind this aging anomaly.

The summer was split into two parts. During the first two weeks, my lab partner, Alex Ionescu ’19, and I familiarized ourselves with mountains of journal articles on oxidative stress and its effects. We also asked vets from central New York for dog skin samples.

The second part of our summer has consisted of lab work. When we receive a sample from the vet, we isolate the primary fibroblasts (connective tissue cells) in our lab. Fibroblasts are easily manipulated. By using chemicals to break the tissue into a solution, we can then use a centrifuge to separate those cells from everything else. We then plate the separated cells in specialized flasks and incubate them to grow for a week before we analyze them.

Once we have enough cells, we run different tests to measure rates of oxygen consumption and glycolysis, antioxidant content, pro-oxidant content, and amount of membrane damage. All of these measurements help us to determine what it is about small dogs that let them live longer than large dogs.

As a rising junior, I am grateful for the opportunity to do primary research, and this experience has made me want to continue down this path after I graduate.

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Summer internship blog series: Colgate’s third culture kids

Career Services: Summer research funding

Colgate University Center for Career Services


Summer internship blog series: Colgate’s third culture kids

July 26, 2016
8 Mariam Nael Headshot

Self-described Third Culture Kid and researcher Mariam Nael ’18

Colgate students have fanned out across the globe to apply their liberal arts know-how in a variety of real-world settings. They are writing back to campus to keep our community posted on their progress. This article was written by Mariam Nael ’18, a women’s studies major from Singapore, completing a student-initiated research fellowship with the university studies division. 

My parents are Pakistani, but I have lived in Singapore, Dubai, Hong Kong, and New York City. The way I see myself has changed a little since I arrived at Colgate — I think my race and ethnicity have become stronger facets of my identity.

One day, I was chatting with some friends from high school about our cultural identity, and I realized that studying the shifts would be an interesting summer research project. Luckily, Colgate has a great program to conduct student-initiated summer research (with funding).

I quickly reached out to Meika Loe, professor of sociology and women’s studies. She helped me focus my idea and supported my proposal, and, fortunately, my proposal was accepted.

According to sociologist David Pollock, a Third Culture Kid (TCK) is defined as someone “who has spent a significant part of his or her developmental years outside [their] parents’ culture.” The “third” culture refers to the mixing of the host country’s culture (the country in which he or she lives) and his or her parents’ culture.

The purpose of my research is to learn about how Third Culture Kids form their personal and cultural identity, especially in college, and whether they experience a shift in the way they self-identify. Additionally, I am interested in whether there is a difference in the formation of identity with non-white TCKs and white TCKs.

Throughout the last month, I have been conducting 45 to 90 minute interviews in Singapore with Third Culture Kids between the ages of 18 and 24. Additionally, I have begun transcribing interviews and systematically coding them for themes. The next step is to analyze them and write a research paper.

It has been fascinating hearing their stories and seeing the similarities and differences not only between the interviewees, but with my own experience as a TCK.

This has been a tough, but valuable, learning process. I wish to continue studying TCKs and identity formation throughout the next few years, hopefully using different methods as well. I am planning to write a research paper, and hopefully, down the line, will try to present or publish it.

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Career Services: Summer Internship Funding

Colgate University Center for Career Services


Summer internship blog series: 4th down and 24 hours to go

July 7, 2016
Jacob King '18 in the lab.

Jacob King ’18 in the lab at Colgate

Colgate students have fanned out across the globe to apply their liberal arts know-how in a variety of real-world settings. They are writing back to keep our community posted on their progress. This article was written by Jacob King ’18, a molecular biology major from Burlington, Conn.

This summer, I’m on campus completing research with biology professor Krista Ingram. Professor Ingram is a leading researcher on circadian rhythms — physical, psychological, and behavioral patterns that roughly follow a 24-hour cycle in humans.

These rhythms influence important aspects of life, like sleep-wake cycles and hormone release. Researchers have also found a correlation between abnormal circadian rhythms and health issues like obesity, cancer, and psychological disorders.

When Chloe Weiss ’18, Celine Marlin Andrews ’18, and I walked into the lab on our first day, we had no idea what to expect. Unlike some research interns, we began at square one, learning about the current findings in the field in order to form a hypothesis that had not already been addressed. We decided that we want to see how student-athletes’ circadian rhythms could influence their performance, both physically and academically.

Our schedule consists of two types of days. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, we do sampling on human participants: the football players who are on campus for the summer. We have the players complete a physical and cognitive task for us, then collect biological markers, which are physical measurements of effort. In our study, we look at heart rate and a stress hormone found in saliva.

The second type of day occurs on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays and consists of mostly processing the saliva we collected, taking the raw data from participants’ task scores, and correlating their performance with their circadian rhythm by looking at the expression levels of certain clock genes.

Clock genes are a set of genes that influence the body’s ability to cycle within 24 hours. Measuring their expression involves looking at the subject’s RNA; the more RNA a subject has at a certain time of day, the more the gene is being expressed.

Then, we have the participants complete a survey that asks about certain daily routines and sleeping habits and allows us to predict what type of rhythm they have.

We have been able work through every aspect of a researcher’s life and get to see the results within the same summer, which is incredible. We hope to have our research published in the months ahead.

Going into my junior year at Colgate, I can easily say that I will be looking into research after I graduate.

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Picture this: science at Colgate

July 1, 2016

First place winner by Claire Kittock ’17 and Noor Anvery ’17

Veins of neon green trace a path across a stark black background in a photo taken by Claire Kittock ’17 and Noor Anvery ’17, displaying a web of microscopic neurons within the brain of a genetically altered fruit fly.

Kittock and Anvery captured the photo through a microscope while researching the cellular architecture of different animals with Mala Misra, assistant professor of biology. The photo later earned first place in the Cooley Science Library’s first ever photo contest.

Kristi Mangine, Colgate’s science library coordinator, thought of the idea for the contest because she wanted to decorate the library’s bare walls and was inspired by several student workers whom she knew were passionate about photography.

“The student photographers have great perspectives on what’s going on around campus,” Mangine noted. “So I thought a photo contest would be great to highlight how [the students] see science at Colgate.”

Second place by Geology professor William Peck

In early February, Mangine and Peter Tagtmeyer, associate science librarian, e-mailed students, faculty, and members of the Colgate community asking for photos that represented their vision of “science at Colgate.”

After receiving 30 photo submissions, Mangine turned again to the community, this time for a vote to determine the six winners whose photos would be placed on permanent display in the library.

The winning photographs varied widely in subjects, techniques, and fields of study.

Geology professor William Peck’s jewel-toned photomicrograph of a moon rock took second place in the contest. The rock was collected by the Apollo 12 mission to Oceanus Procellarum in 1969. Peck receives a set of lunar samples from NASA every spring for use in his Geology 202 class, and this year’s sample, Lunar Basalt 12005, contained minerals that settled out of the moon’s lava lake approximately 3 billion years ago.

Third place by Leda Rosenthal ’18

In third place was a portrait of an inquisitive dairy cow snapped by Leda Rosenthal ’18. Rosenthal’s photo came from her time spent at the Durfee dairy farm in Chittenango, N.Y., where she worked as an agricultural economic fellow for Colgate’s Upstate Institute last summer.

Mangine noted that the contest had the added benefit of exposing little-known research projects on campus. “That’s the thing about Colgate,” she said. “There’s such amazing research going on behind closed doors. This contest lets you see it.”


New agreement launches Singapore exchange program

June 24, 2016
A new agreement between Colgate University and the Naitonal University of Singapore will create new off-campus study options in 2017.

Representatives from Colgate University and the National University of Singapore sign a memorandum of understanding creating a new student exchange program in 2017. (photo by Alice Verdin-Speer)

Students looking for a dynamic off-campus experience that also allows them to engage in scientific research will have more options in 2017, thanks to a new agreement between Colgate University and the National University of Singapore (NUS).

After more than a year of exploration and development, representatives of Colgate and the NUS signed a memorandum of understanding June 7, creating a new exchange program to benefit students from both institutions, and to act as a catalyst for future faculty collaboration.

The agreement affords new research options for students in the departments of mathematics, computer science, biology, chemistry, and physics & astronomy. Jason Meyers, associate professor of biology, will lead the first group of Colgate students to Singapore in the fall of 2017, but unlike other full-semester study groups, Meyers will accompany students for just a few weeks before returning to campus in Hamilton, N.Y., to teach.

In the spring, NUS students, already acquainted  with students from Colgate, will then come to Hamilton, N.Y., to take courses, conduct research, and experience the liberal arts.

“We really wanted to build on the successful National Institutes of Health program in Washington, D.C., in which students take two courses and independent research for credit,” said Nicole Simpson, professor of economics and associate dean of the faculty for international initiatives. “Undergraduate research isn’t common at large institutions internationally, so there was a short list of places that are rigorous and strong in the sciences, but that also applaud undergraduate research.”

Simpson said that, because NUS has existing relationships with Yale and Cornell universities, their faculty and administrators are already familiar with the liberal arts, and their curriculum has rigorous standards akin to Colgate’s.

The new partnership was developed, in part, thanks to Ed ’62, P’10 and Robin Lampert P’10, whose generosity supported the founding of the Lampert Institute for Civic and Global Affairs at Colgate. The Lamperts have made a $2.5 million commitment to internationalization, and they also offered to match additional gifts of $500,000 up to $2.5 million for international initiatives.

NUS Professor Roger Tan, vice dean and faculty of science, education and special duties, said he hopes this new endeavor will create more opportunities for cooperation in the future between the two institutions of learning.

“[NUS] students will certainly benefit from your broad-based liberal arts education,” Tan said during a visit to Colgate earlier this month. “I hope we give them an unforgettable experience.”

Professor Damhnait McHugh, Colgate natural sciences and mathematics division director, said that when she visited NUS with Meyers, Simpson and four other faculty in the natural sciences on their fact-finding mission this past January, it became abundantly clear that the university had extensive support systems and a strong commitment to welcoming international students.

“We want our students to really make the most of their social and cultural experience as well, and we hope for international faculty collaborations to develop in the coming years,” McHugh said. “We are very excited about the possibilities.”

Related:
Off-campus study
Lampert Institute for Civic and Global Affairs
Colgate Study Groups


Summer internship blog series: fighting frontotemporal degeneration

June 23, 2016
Laynie Dratch ’17 (left) and Meghan Healey ’11

Laynie Dratch ’17 (left) and Meghan Healey ’11

Colgate students have fanned out across the globe to apply their liberal arts know-how in a variety of real-world settings. They are writing back to campus to keep our community posted on their progress. This article was written by Laynie Dratch ’17, a neuroscience major from Ambler, Pa., conducting research at the Penn Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) Center at the University of Pennsylvania.

This is my second summer at the Penn FTD Center, which brings together an interdisciplinary team of clinicians and researchers with common goals of studying frontotemporal degeneration spectrum disorders as well as providing care and support to patients and their caregivers.

Frontotemporal degeneration is a term used to describe a continuum of disorders marked by progressive brain cell loss in the frontal and temporal regions of the brain — the most recognizable disorder is Alzheimer’s disease. Few realize that similar dementias exist. Disorders such as primary progressive aphasia and corticobasal syndrome often present as changes in personality, gait, or language, rather than memory loss, and are challenging to diagnose. These atypical dementias, which can be confusing and frustrating for patients and their families, often appear in people in their 50s and 60s.

Places like the Penn FTD Center are rare, and I am proud to be part of a team that is leading the research and patient care for this struggling population that is still looking for a cure. A bonus: I have the pleasure of working with Meghan Healey ’11, a graduate student in the center.

This summer, I am involved in a project that compares typical Alzheimer’s to its atypical variants by studying differences in imaging biomarkers throughout disease duration. Working at the Penn FTD Center has provided me with countless other educational opportunities: I have participated in lab meetings, presented papers, served as a control in experiments, learned computer skills, observed a brain autopsy, and attended the center’s annual FTD Caregiver Conference, bringing together patients, caregivers, researchers, clinicians, and advocates for a day focused on practical information and the state of the science.

There are few, if any, centers that can match the resources, ability, and compassion that allow the Penn FTD Center to both care for and learn from its patients. The underlying themes of Penn’s success are collaboration and compassion. Every member of the team is important, and everyone contributes. Working at the center among the field’s brightest doctors, researchers, and nurses has taught me so much, both professionally and personally. I entered the center with absolutely no biomedical research experience, and now understand all of the different contributors to what is a much bigger and more complicated process than I ever imagined. I learned that my strengths include collaboration and analysis, while coding and statistics are my next areas to focus on improving. Most importantly, my time at the center has shown me that I work best in a collaborative environment, and has provided me with a network of support comprised of some of the field’s top academics and medical professionals. This experience has also shown me that I want to work in a sector of the field that has contact with, or direct impact on, the lives of patients and their families.

Related:
Career Services
Jobs and Internships


Hannah Bercovici ’17 reports from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

April 4, 2016
Research vessel Atlantis sits beside a dock

Research vessel Atlantis ready to cruise atop the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (photo by Maris Wicks)

Editor’s note: Hannah Bercovici ’17, a geology major from Woodbridge, Conn., is the only undergraduate member of the science party aboard the research vessel Atlantis, currently cruising over the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, somewhere around the 14th parallel north. Bercovici and her colleagues from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution are hunting for seafloor basalt — “popping rocks” that could give insights into the volatile (gaseous) composition of Earth’s mantle. We asked Hannah to give us a snapshot of her life on Atlantis, and she obliged with this note to the Colgate community.

On board, the day starts at every hour.

One person will be eating breakfast as another is settling in for bed, and you get that mid-afternoon feeling at 2 a.m. because you’ve only been awake since 8 p.m. As a member of the science party, I’ve gotten pretty lucky with my sleep schedule. While in transit from Bridgetown, Barbados, to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, I was on the 8–12 watch. I would wake up at 8 a.m. and work until 12 p.m., and then have eight hours off.

Read more


Netflix and will

March 1, 2016
Abandoned study spaces at Case Library

Photo by Andrew Daddio

Stress, sleep deprivation, and constant pressure can be a drain on even the most hardworking college student’s motivation.

Last November, members of the first-year seminar (FSEM) Willpower: The Science of Self Control, studied ways in which students can manage their workload — and its fallout — by finding ways to motivate themselves. Then, they gave a presentation to members of the Ciccone Commons to discuss their findings.

Read more


Colgate joins Beckman Scholars Program

January 21, 2016
Student stands at a lab table, reading notes in Wynn Hall

Photo by Andrew Daddio

Colgate University has been named as a Beckman Scholars Program institutional award recipient for 2016.

The grant, totaling $104,000, will provide multi-year research funding for students majoring in biology or chemistry. Colgate joins a distinguished list of universities that received the award from the Irvine, Calif.–based Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation in 2016 — it includes Emory, Vanderbilt, and the University of Chicago among others.

“We are delighted to have been selected,” said Damhnait McHugh, Raab Family Chair and Professor of biology; director of the division of natural sciences and mathematics. “It offers our top students unparalleled opportunities to engage in extended scholarship.”

Read more


Good Morning, Dolphins!

January 13, 2016
Tori Hymel stands on a platform looking down at a dolphin

Tori Hymel ’16 works with dolphins during an extended study trip to the Florida Keys (Photo by Krista Ingram)

(Editor’s note: Fourteen students accompanied Associate Professor of Biology Krista Ingram on an extended study trip to the Florida Keys during winter break to study marine mammal cognition, behavior, and conservation at the Dolphin Research Center. They chronicled their full experience on the off-campus learning blog — here’s a sample, written by Elly Hilton ’17, Madeleine Tsao ’17, and Lacey Williams ’16 on day two of their trip.)

We began the day as usual with a walk around the docks to each lagoon, waving and saying hello to each dolphin. We were still amazed to see the eagerness with which each dolphin approached us, seeming to recognize us from the day before. From the far side of every lagoon the dolphins would swim over to us as soon as they spied us walking down the docks, swimming the length of the dock and eyeing us with a curious sense of recognition and interest. After the rounds we headed over to the front lagoon to prepare for our second dolphin encounter.

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$500,000 NSF grant funds sacred forest research in Ethiopia

November 30, 2015
A sacred forest rises from farmland in Ethiopia

A view of a sacred forest in Ethiopia’s northern highlands (photo by Peter Klepeis)

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded $500,000 in funding to an interdisciplinary team of Colgate faculty, led by Associate Professor of Biology Catherine Cardelús, to continue investigating the status and conservation of sacred forests in Ethiopia’s northern highlands.

Christian Orthodox churches emerged in Ethiopia some 800 years ago. Today, thousands of these sites protect some of the region’s last remaining native forests, which stand out in a landscape otherwise dominated by agriculture and rangeland. Sacred forests have survived in spite of changes in societies and the ways in which humans use their land.

“Priests, monks, school children, and others are constantly walking and working in these forests, using them for everything from worshipping to schooling,” Cardelús said. “I hope to learn from those who already use ecosystems sustainably and leverage their methods to help others.”

To that end, Cardelús has tapped colleagues at Colgate and beyond to conduct an interdisciplinary study that will determine the current ecological health of the forests as well as changes in their structure and the perceptions of nearby populations over time.

She is joined on the project by Peter Scull, associate professor of geography; Peter Klepeis, professor of geography and geography department chair; and Carrie Woods, former visiting professor at Colgate, now visiting professor of biology at the University of Puget Sound. The team has also hired two scholars — Ethiopia historian Izabela Orlowska and Alemayehu Wassie, a forester and Christian Orthodox Tewahido Church priest — to operate full-time in country.

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Student helps county earn federal funding for clean wells

November 4, 2015
A GIS map of karst topography in Madison County, N.Y.

One of several GIS maps created by Kayleigh Bhangdia ’16 during her summer internship with the Madison County Department of Health.

Thanks in part to research conducted by a Colgate geography and environmental studies student, Madison County will receive more than a half-million dollars in federal funding for well-water testing and remediation to take place during the next five years.

Kayleigh Bhangdia ’16, of Poughquag, N.Y., worked with the Madison County Department of Health this summer, via Colgate’s Upstate Institute, to examine where private drinking wells may be threatened by known contaminated sites, spills, agricultural runoff, and bulk storage locations.

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Xintao Ding ’17: Looking at the genetic makeup of poodles

July 27, 2015
Xintao

Xintao Ding is a molecular biology major from Zhenzhou, China

Editor’s note: In this series, Colgate students share stories about their summer experiences in offices, labs, and open spaces across the world.

This summer, I am on campus working with Professor Barbara Hoopes in the biology department. Our lab is conducting research on genes that determine size variation in poodles. Read more


Students present summer research

July 24, 2015

Poster-presentations_WEB

From photochemical pathways to early animation devices to homosexuality in the Arab world — undergraduate research topics explored this summer by students and faculty were presented at yesterday’s poster session.  Read more


Warren Dennis ’16: Preparing for NASA’s future by understanding its past

July 13, 2015
Warren Dennis

Warren Dennis ’16 in front of the Space Shuttle Discovery

Editor’s note: In this series, Colgate students share stories about their summer experiences in offices, labs, and open spaces across the world.

This summer, I’m interning for the History Program Office of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in Washington, D.C. By providing easy access to information about its past successes and failures, the history office helps NASA to grow and better prepare for future situations. Read more


Madison Paulk ’16: Conducting social research in South Africa

July 6, 2015
Madison Paulk '16, a political science and African studies double major from Buffalo, N.Y. atop the Moses Mabhida Stadium in Durban, built for the 2010 World Cup.

Madison Paulk ’16, a political science and African studies double major from Buffalo, N.Y., atop the Moses Mabhida Stadium in Durban.

Editor’s note: In this series, Colgate students share stories about their summer experiences in offices, labs, and open spaces across the world.

This summer, I am in Durban, South Africa, conducting research with Congolese refugees through first-hand communication. Read more


Alexandria Dyer ’14 awarded a Fulbright to conduct research in Ghana

May 6, 2015

Alexandria Dyer ’14, of Portland, Ore., has been awarded a Fulbright research grant to travel to Ghana to study public health.

Dyer will conduct research on the empowering social space of women’s hair salons and will then develop a pilot women’s health workshop for these informal settings.

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Sara Reese ’16 named a 2015 Udall Scholar

April 20, 2015

Sara Reese ’16, of Midlothian, Va., is one of just 50 students nationwide to be awarded a Udall Scholarship in 2015.

The Udall Scholarship is awarded to college sophomores and juniors for leadership, public service, and commitment to issues related to the environment or to American Indian nations. The scholarship honors the legacies of Morris Udall and Stewart Udall, whose careers had a significant impact on American Indian self-governance, health care, and the stewardship of public lands and natural resources.

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New system recovers helium for laboratory use

March 19, 2015
Matt LeGro ’15 and Professor Ken Segall are using helium in their research studying the behavior of Josephson junctions (small electrical circuits) to see if they can model neuron behaviors in the brain. Photo by Andrew Daddio

Matt LeGro ’15 and Professor Ken Segall are using helium in their research studying the behavior of Josephson junctions (small electrical circuits) to see if they can model neuron behaviors in the brain. Photo by Andrew Daddio

Party balloons can no longer be taken for granted: there’s a worldwide shortage of helium. Prices quadrupled between 2000 and 2012, according to the U.S. Government Accountability Office. But a new helium-recovery system will put Colgate’s science laboratories at the forefront of efforts to conserve the dwindling supply of this increasingly expensive gas. Read more


Professor-student team discuss preliminary research findings on eating local

December 8, 2014
Colgate professors and students

Sarah DeFalco ’15, Professor Christopher Henke, Stephanie Chen ’16, and Professor April Baptiste

Turns out, it’s more affordable than you would think to be a “locavore” (eating locally produced food), at least in Madison County. This observation is based on preliminary research findings by Professor Christopher Henke, Professor April Baptiste, Stephanie Chen ’16, and Sarah DeFalco ’15.

The group gave a presentation titled “Can Everyone Be a Locavore? Food Access for Low-Income Residents of Madison County” at the Hamilton Public Library on Tuesday, November 18.

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Longyear Museum presents exhibition featuring Native American baskets

November 12, 2014

The Longyear Museum of Anthropology will celebrate the opening of the exhibition Weaving Identities: Native American Baskets in the Longyear Museum Collection with a reception on Thursday, November 13, from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. The reception will feature a Q&A by 15 students who researched the baskets as a project for the course Native Art of North America.

Basket weaving is an ancient Native American art, which has been practiced continuously over millennia and has developed various regional distinctions based on materials, form, and technique.

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Students gain access to world-class telescope in New Mexico

October 1, 2014
Colgate students will be able to use the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 meter telescope.

The Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 meter telescope.

Colgate students will have the opportunity to get closer to the stars thanks to a three-year arrangement that provides them with valuable access to a world-class telescope at the Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico. Read more


National Science Foundation grants foster faculty research

September 12, 2014
Professor Michael Loranty was among several Colgate professors in Siberia photo by Logan Burner I've also included a photo of thawing permafrost (which is relevant to the proposal), the person under the bug jacket is me and the photo was taken in Siberia by Logan Berner. studies permafrost

Geography professor Michael Loranty studies permafrost in Siberia. Loranty was one of several Colgate professors who recently received an NSF grant. Photo by Logan Berner

Professors researching a wide array of subjects — from privacy software to fieldwork in the Galapagos — recently received National Science Foundation grant awards totaling $1,328,055. Read more


Natasha Torres ’15 assesses study abroad experiences of students of color

September 8, 2014
Natasha Torres '15

Based on her own experiences studying abroad, Natasha Torres ’15 developed her research project about how other students of color navigated their experiences.

Colgate students are reflecting on their summer research with faculty members on campus and in the field. This post is by Natasha Torres ’15, an educational studies major and women’s studies minor from Cleveland, Ohio, who was given an award for outstanding research at the fall student poster session.

My study abroad experience, which included a semester in Italy and extended study to South Africa, was life changing — in far more complicated ways than I had expected. My two experiences were drastically different, but both informed the reasons for conducting my research and are deeply embedded within my project. Read more