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Colgate seniors present research to leading scholars in Japan

April 16, 2014
J&M traveling_WEB

Jessica Huang ’14 and Michael Manansala ’14 presented their research at Kobe University in Japan and also had time for some independent travel.

Over spring break, Jessica Huang ’14 and Michael Manansala ’14 put the capstone on a research project that they’ve been working on for much of their Colgate careers. Traveling to Kansai, Japan, the seniors presented their research titled “Does observing or producing different types of hand gestures help second-language auditory learning of Japanese short and long vowels?” Read more


April Bailey ’14 dances with gender issues in her research and performance

March 7, 2014
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Performed by 17 students, Wires accompanied women’s studies and psychology research by April Bailey ’14 (far right). Photos by Ashlee Eve ’14

In the last movement of her dance performance titled Wires, April Bailey ’14 (pictured in pink) breaks free from the group and moves independently — just as she’s demonstrated academically.  Read more


Students blog from Antarctica as they research Totten Glacier

February 28, 2014
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Totten iceberg

“We are truly exploring new territory,” wrote Kara Vadman ’14 and Mikhaila Redovian ’15 after the research vessel they boarded in January headed into uncharted waters near Totten Glacier, Antarctica.  Read more


Examining the history of the Holocaust through art

February 25, 2014
Gabriella Nikolic

Figure 4 from the One Day, One Woman, One Child exhibition

Striking images of Holocaust victims overlaid with paint and text stare back at viewers as they encounter the pieces in the exhibition One Day, One Woman, One Child — which will be in the Longyear Museum of Anthropology until this Friday.  Read more


Kelsey Jensen ’14 spends three weeks with Colgate team studying forests in Ethiopia

February 13, 2014
Kelsey Jensen '14 (center), with Josh Hair '14 and Professor Carrie Woods, traveled to Ethiopia during winter break.

Kelsey Jensen ’14 (center), with Josh Hair ’14 and Professor Carrie Woods, traveled to Ethiopia during winter break.

(Editor’s Note: This post is by Kelsey Jensen ’14, a chemistry major from Williston, Vt. See more photos and read about her daily experiences in Ethiopia at her personal blog.)

During winter break I discovered that working on an interdisciplinary research project in a foreign country is one of the most interesting ways to learn about a new culture.

Research that combines natural science, social science, and humanities is rare to find, but Colgate is a university where collaborations like this happen, and I was lucky enough to get involved. Using the Alumni Memorial Scholarship granted to me upon admission, I spent three weeks of my winter break in Ethiopia working with Professors Catherine Cardelus and Carrie Woods from the Department of Biology, Peter Klepeis and Peter Scull from the Department of Geography, and Eliza Kent from the Department of Religion, studying the Ethiopian Orthodox Church Forests.

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Get to know: Arielle Sperling ’14, double major in environmental studies and English

January 16, 2014
Arielle Sperling '14 worked as an intern in Idaho for the Henry’s Fork Foundation.

Arielle Sperling ’14 worked as an intern in Idaho for the Henry’s Fork Foundation.

Before last summer, Arielle Sperling ’14 hadn’t so much as gone fishing, never mind touched a fish. But during her internship in Ashton, Idaho, Sperling found herself hip-deep in trout. The environmental studies major from White Plains, N.Y., was the only Colgate student in a group of researchers who were looking at the habitat selection of adult rainbow trout.

Every year, Colgate sends a student to intern with the Henry’s Fork Foundation through a fellowship program funded by the late Jeffry Timmons ’64 and his wife, Sara. This year’s group was trying to gain a better understanding of where the fish feed and to determine the water variables (depth, temperature, flow rate, and substrates) of those spots.

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Colgate students study local deer population and provide management ideas

December 19, 2013
Colgate students studied the local population of white-tailed deer and the impact it has on area residents.Colgate students studied the local population of white-tail deer and the impact it has on area residents.

Colgate students studied the local population of white-tailed deer and the impact it has on area residents.  (Photo by Charles Lichtenauer ’14)

Colgate student researchers met with community members recently to discuss a problem that affects not only the town and village of Hamilton, but the entire nation — the overpopulation of white-tailed deer.

The students presented their findings from a semester-long research project that was an integral part of the Community-based Study of Environmental Issues course they are taking with Assistant Professor of Biology Catherine Cardelus.

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Sarah Dickson ‘14 finds that research from semester in Tunisia supports PCON studies

December 10, 2013
Sarah Dickson '14 (left) spent a semester in Tunisia that has led to two academic research projects.

Sarah Dickson ’14 (left) spent a semester studying in Tunisia.

Colgate students are sharing their experiences conducting research with faculty members on campus and in the field. This post is by peace and conflict studies major Sarah Dickson, of Wayne, Penn.

In January 2011, almost a month after street protests broke out in Tunisia against high unemployment rates and government corruption, the nation’s president gave in to protesters’ demands and fled the country. The Tunisian revolution’s success is believed to have ignited the regional “Arab Spring” movement.

As a peace and conflict studies major concentrating on the Middle East and North Africa, I was extremely interested in the events happening in Tunisia. And, as someone who has studied French for many years, I was eager to practice my language skills in the French-speaking North African country. So, I set my sights on going to Tunisia.

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Evan Chartier ‘14 completes course to become nursing assistant as part of thesis project

November 25, 2013
Evan Chartier ’14

Evan Chartier ’14 discusses his research with fellow students at a Division of University Studies event. (Photo by Anna Heil ’16)

Colgate students are sharing their experiences conducting research with faculty members on campus and in the field. This post is by sociology/anthropology and women’s studies major Evan Chartier ‘14, of Oak Park, Illinois.

Almost everyone has known a nursing assistant. They might take your vitals at the hospital or help with daily activities that someone cannot do on their own. They care for our children, our sick, and our injured as well as our elderly. But, how many of us really know who these amazing individuals are, and what drives them to perform this essential work? This was the question that I set out to explore during the summer of 2013.

The first step in my journey to understanding the people behind this crucial work was to become a nursing assistant myself. So I enrolled in a nursing assistant course and traveled a daily four-hour round-trip commute to learn the skills that many of us take for granted when we are being cared for. I completed the course and am now a certified home health aide and nursing assistant.

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Brandon Fiegoli ’14 studying proteins and potential role in causing cancer

November 19, 2013
Molecular biology major Brandon Fiegoli, of Bedford, NY.

Molecular biology major Brandon Fiegoli, of Bedford, N.Y., has been conducting research with Professor Engda Hagos. (Photo by Natalie Sportelli ’15)

Colgate students are sharing their experiences conducting research with faculty members on campus and in the field. This post is by molecular biology major Brandon Fiegoli, of Bedford, NY.

Every day, you hear about an infamous disease called cancer. You are constantly reading about celebrities with breast cancer, kidney cancer, and many more. You may even have friends or family members fighting the disease. But what do you really know about cancer? Where does it come from?  Why does it occur and how does it harm us?

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Psychology major Casey Sherman ‘14 researches what makes memories stick

October 29, 2013
Casey Sherman '14 is studying how we process memories. (Photo by Natalie Sportelli '15)

Casey Sherman ’14 is studying how we process memories. (Photo by Natalie Sportelli ’15)

Colgate students are sharing their experiences conducting research with faculty members on campus and in the field. This post is by Casey Sherman ‘14, of Vancouver, who is a psychology major.

Each day you see hundreds of different stimuli. You pay attention to certain environmental features, but not to others; some things change, and others stay constant. At the end of the day, you’re left with an array of memories. You’ll forget some details from the day, but other memories remain with you for future use.

My thesis research, supervised by Professor Douglas Johnson, is intended to explore several questions about memory. How does attention to experiences affect your memory of them? Are changes or consistency in the environment more readily remembered? Are changes in the environment processed differently depending how much attention you pay to them?

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Jia Zheng ‘14 utilizes interdisciplinary approach to research project about climate change

October 10, 2013
Jia Zheng ‘14 (second from left) discusses her research at a recent Division of University Studies event. With her are  Evan Chartier '14 and Faith Benson.

Jia Zheng ‘14 (second from left) discusses her research at a recent Division of University Studies event with fellow researchers Evan Chartier ’14 and Faith Benson ’14.

Colgate students are sharing their experiences conducting research with faculty members on campus and in the field. This post is by Jia Zheng ‘14, of the Bronx, who is an environmental studies and educational studies double major.

This summer, I was awarded a research apprenticeship through the Division of University Studies. For 10 weeks, I assisted environmental studies professor April Baptiste and educational studies professor Melissa Kagle with a section of their long-term research that focuses on bringing together modern scientific understanding and indigenous understanding of climate change in regions of the Caribbean and the Arctic. Read more


Hannah Bjornson ’15 assists professor with research for book about ancient temple

September 25, 2013
The eighth-century Kailasanatha temple is in the southern Indian city of Kanchipuram.

The eighth-century Kailasanatha temple is in the southern Indian city of Kanchipuram.

Colgate students are sharing their experiences conducting research with faculty members on campus and in the field. This post is by art history major Hannah Bjornson ‘15, of Westport, Conn.

This summer I held a faculty-sponsored research position in the Department of Art and Art History. I assisted Professor Padma Kaimal in putting together her book about the eighth-century Kailasanatha temple complex in the southern Indian city of Kanchipuram.

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PBS features worm research of Colgate professor Tim McCay and students

September 23, 2013

A new Mountain Lake PBS segment features the research of Colgate biology professor Tim McCay and four students who spent the summer studying invasive earthworms and their impact on native species in the Adirondacks.

“Its mission, to boldly go where few, if any, worm researchers have gone before; to seek out and identify earthworms of all kinds, wherever the professor and his intrepid students can find them,” said PBS host Ed Kanze.

Read more


Carlie Wetzel ’14, Living Writers researcher, helps prepare for Saunders’s arrival

September 6, 2013

Colgate students are sharing their experiences conducting research with faculty members on campus and in the field. This post is by English major Carlie Wetzel ‘14, of Lancaster, Pa. 

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Carlie Wetzel ’14 with George Saunders’s Tenth of December

This summer, I held a faculty-sponsored research position with the Colgate Living Writers program, where I worked closely with Professors Jane Pinchin and Jennifer Brice, who teach the Living Writers course.

I’m continuing my internship this fall by helping facilitate the actual events. I will assist with the public readings, field questions sent in from online participants, assist with the Living Writers course, and have the opportunity to dine with the course’s featured authors.

Every year, Colgate invites nine to ten prominent authors from all over the world to campus to speak about their work. Each author converses with the sixty students enrolled in the Living Writers course for a full class period. Then, each author holds a public reading open to the whole campus and community. Several of the authors also participate in an online discussion available to alumni, parents, and friends taking part in LW Online.

This summer my research included carefully reading each of the selected works and compiling approximately 50 resources for each author—including book reviews, interviews, videos, biographies, and other works. I created a Moodle site for the course which listed the best resources I could find for each author;  I also included the schedule for their readings and on-campus events.

This year’s group of authors is really stellar. The works include short story collections, fiction works, a poetry collection, as well as two works of non-fiction.

During my summer research, I brainstormed connections between the works that would be interesting and relevant to students, a project I found to be fascinating. During my reading, I also considered issues of class, race, modern technology, and the human condition, which all intertwine in this fall’s provocative pieces.

Our special initiative this year is Colgate Reads 2013. We met our goal by recruiting over 2,013 people to pledge to read a short story written by our first Living Writers author, George Saunders. I helped facilitate conversation on a special blog made for this initiative. It was really interesting to discuss Saunders’s works with students, faculty, and alumni in an online community forum.

Saunders will talk about his short story collection, Tenth of December, this Tuesday, September 10, at 4:30 pm in Memorial Chapel. The event will also be livestreamed. I hope many people will come together in person and online to join the event!