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Colgate hosts 73rd professional network event

April 29, 2016
Panelists on stage discussing the changing media landscape with Jeff Fager '77, executive producer of 60 Minutes.

Panelists discuss the changing media landscape with Jeff Fager ’77, executive producer of 60 Minutes. (Photo by Lorenzo Ciniglio)

Colgate University launched its professional networks two years ago to promote alumni engagement, cultivate new professional opportunities for members, and support undergraduate career development. Since then, thousands of alumni, parents, and students have engaged with professional networks by attending online, regional, and on-campus events.

Last month, Colgate launched the new Marketing, Media, and Communications Network and brought alumni, parents, and students together to discuss the state of journalism in the digital world — the professional network program’s 73rd event.

Jeff Fager ’77, executive producer of 60 Minutes, moderated a panel of alumni and parents that featured Joey Bartolomeo ’95, executive editor, SeventeenDina Dunn ’88, P’19 founder and general manager, Blink, LLC (and Thought Into Action mentor); Andrew Heyward P’00, faculty associate at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and principal at Heyward Advisory LLC; Todd Larsen ’88, chief executive officer, Blurb, Inc.; and John Martin ’84, managing director, NASCAR Digital Media.

Students who attended the event were able to hear from seasoned communications professionals and network with an even broader range of people.

Alumni talking

Alumni make connections at the Colgate Professional Networks’ 73rd event. (Photo by Lorenzo Ciniglio)

“I really enjoyed attending the marketing, media, and communications launch because of the emphasis the panelists placed on creating and building your own personal brand,” said Kerry Houston ’16. “I found their experiences and insight on this constantly changing and evolving industry to be very helpful in learning how to successfully market myself and my skills.”

The 10 different professional networks offer students (and parents) a chance to glimpse a roadmap to a desired career and learn from smart alumni about topics specific to their industry. They also allow alumni to network together.

“Every Colgate grad knows the power of our network, but to see it in action is palpable,” said Sian-Pierre Regis ’06. “Some of the biggest names in media showed up to the MMC event, dropping serious knowledge on the shifting state of the industry — to be able to get intel and then dive deeper in follow-up conversations is invaluable.”

While this event was a panel discussion, many professional networking events are not. Online events like the one on Colgate Day, are an opportunity for alumni to connect with each other wherever they live and work. On-campus events like SophoMORE Connections connect alumni, faculty, and students. For a list of upcoming events, visit colgate.edu/networks.

Related links:
Watch the entire Marketing, Media & Communications panel discussion
Attend the Colgate Day online networking event
See all of Colgate’s Professional Networks
Watch the Law and Finance summit


Syllabus: Silent Warfare

April 21, 2016
Persson Hall

Photo by Andrew Daddio

Editor’s note: Wondering what’s happening in the classroom at Colgate? Here’s a real-time glimpse into academic life on campus — a syllabus from a course underway this semester.

POSC 390 Silent Warfare: Intelligence Analysis and Statecraft
Danielle Lupton, Assistant Professor of Political Science
MW 1:20-2:35, Persson 133

Course Description:
This course introduces students to the complex and crucial process of obtaining, analyzing, and producing intelligence in the making of American foreign policy. We cover subjects including problems with the structure of the intelligence community, covert action, psychological and bureaucratic constraints on analysts and policy makers, and how the intelligence community has responded to key threats. This course also explores the ethical issues raised by intelligence gathering, such as the use of enhanced interrogation techniques, the role of whistleblowers, and accountability of the intelligence community.

Key assignments/activities:
There are three central written assignments. The first is an analysis of an intelligence agency, where students identify challenges facing an agency and provide solutions. The second is an active learning assignment in which students conduct research on themselves based on publicly available data and write a report regarding the ethics of open-source intelligence based on their findings. The final paper for this course is an in-depth investigation into a major intelligence failure, its causes, and ways to prevent such failures in the future.

Readings:
The main text will be Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy (6th Edition) by Mark Lowenthal.

The professor says:
“Students will gain a deeper understanding of the inter-workings of foreign policy by analyzing the value of information and how it supports the policy process. We engage with critical issues that affect not only policy makers, but also each of us as individuals, such as the use of drones to combat terrorism, the rise of increased domestic surveillance, and the ethics of enhanced interrogation techniques.

“In class, we focus our discussion on dissecting problems facing the intelligence community as well as providing solutions to those problems. Using this problem-based approach, students can apply the skills developed through course discussions and written work to any area of analysis in the future.”


Colgate senior wins Rangel Fellowship

April 18, 2016
Ranissa Adityavarman ’16, has been named a a 2016 Rangel Fellow.

Ranissa Adityavarman ’16 has been named a 2016 Rangel Fellow.

Ranissa Adityavarman ’16, an international relations major from Manlius, N.Y., is one of just 30 students nationwide to be named a 2016 Rangel Fellow, which provides financial and professional development support for graduate studies and to help facilitate entry into a career with the U.S. Foreign Service.

The Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Program, formed in 2002, is a unique partnership between Howard University and the U.S. Department of State; its goals are to promote greater diversity and excellence within the U.S. Foreign Service.

“I decided to take this path because working for the Foreign Service can be, in my mind, one of the most important ways to influence foreign policy in our country,” Adityavarman said. “We are always going to have foreign policy decisions to make, and I want to be one of the people on the ground, lobbying for what is best not only for our national interests but also the interests of the countries with which we’re working.”

At Colgate, Adityavarman studied abroad as a junior with the Geneva study group, is an economics minor, and a member of the Gamma Phi Beta sorority. Adityavarman also spent time volunteering at the Bumi Sehat Foundation in Bali, Indonesia, thanks to a COVE Levine-Weinberg Fellowship.

“This is a wonderful accomplishment, and I’m really proud of Ranissa,” said Kim Germain, Colgate’s Assistant Dean for Fellowship Advising. “She is poised to begin a great career in the Foreign Service, and winning the Rangel means that she will have strong support and mentorship throughout her journey there.”

Rangel Fellowships provide funding for two-year graduate programs in international affairs (up to $47,500 annually), arrange a mentor within the State Department for each fellow, provide paid internships and other professional development, and facilitate entry into the U.S. Foreign Service.

“I’ve been interested in foreign relations and politics for longer than I can remember, and working for the Department of State is a surefire way to get involved in both,” Adityavarman said. “Colgate’s Geneva Study Group was extremely influential… Working for a large humanitarian organization like CARE International, as well as meeting U.S. diplomats — who are foreign service officers — in their respective organizations was both humbling and inspiring.”


Two seniors awarded Fulbrights to Germany

April 12, 2016

Two Colgate students will teach English in Germany for a year thanks to being awarded Fulbright English Teaching Assistantships.

William Andrews ’16, a German and international relations major from of Richmond, Va., and Carolyn “Cara” Skelly ’16, a German and Middle Eastern and Islamic studies double major from Wellesley, Mass., will be helping students to learn the English language while also serving as ambassadors of American culture.

Read more


Professors showcase work in on-campus exhibition

April 6, 2016
Corden steel sculpture by Colgate Professor DeWitt Godfrey

Luttel, a steel cylinder sculpture by Professor DeWitt Godfrey. Photo by Mark Williams

With varying styles, materials, and scales, the work of Colgate’s studio art professors has filled Clifford Gallery — giving visitors a glimpse at what they do outside of the classroom. Read more


Konosioni to hold 19th annual auction on April 8

April 4, 2016
From travel aficionados to baseball fans to supporters of the local food movement, bidders showed their spirit at the 16th-annual Konosioni Charity Auction. The senior honor society’s largest annual public event — whose theme this year was “’Tis the Spirit that is Colgate” —raised $20,000 that will be used to give funding to local nonprofit organizations in Madison County. Items for the auction, which was held on Friday, April 12 at the Palace Theater, were donated by local businesses and Colgate students, parents, professors, and alumni. The wide variety of offerings ranged from gift baskets, handmade crafts, and jewelry to yard work and other services, dates with Konosioni members, and a Common Thread Community Farm Share. Among the big-ticket items were a weeklong stay at a Paris apartment and seats at several New York Mets, Yankees, and Boston Red Sox games. In the hours before the auction, Konosioni held a Spirit Festival that showcased student and local talent, with performances at various locations across campus and in downtown Hamilton. The festival was meant to demonstrate not only the Colgate spirit but also that of the surrounding community, said Konosioni member David Esber ’13, through the participation of residents, and local business owners. The Konosioni Charity Auction raises funds to be distributed to nonprofit organizations in Madison County.

The Konosioni Charity Auction raises funds to be distributed to nonprofit organizations in Madison County.

The Konosioni Senior Honor Society will host its 19th annual charity auction on April 8 at 8 p.m. in the Hall of Presidents. Proceeds from the auction will benefit nonprofit organizations in upstate New York via Madison County Gives.

Konosioni is excited to welcome alumni, Colgate community members, and residents from the area to this event. Items of all kinds, from vacation escapes in Jackson Hole, Wyo., to baseball tickets and home-cooked meals, are available for bidding. The $25,000 raised during last year’s auction benefited a diverse group of seven charitable organizations, reaching a wide group of needs and populations throughout Madison County.

Read more


Colgate students teach coding at local elementary school

March 18, 2016
Colgate Women in Computer Science students help teach coding to local elementary school students.

Samantha Braver ’18 helps teach computer coding at Hamilton Central School as a member of the Colgate Women in Computer Science club. (Photo by Andrew Daddio)

Little fingers tapped away at computer keys after school at Hamilton Central School (HCS) on a recent sunny afternoon, but instead of manipulating blocks in Minecraft or posting to Facebook, they were busy writing computer code.

The afternoon coding class for students in grades three through five is the creation of Colgate’s Women in Computer Science club, whose members decided to share the skills learned in their college classrooms with the eager elementary school students.

Read more


English department hosts Miltonathon

March 18, 2016
The serpent cake the English department served during Miltonathon.

Let them eat snake: English department serves a serpent-shaped cake during its Miltonathon

On Sunday, March 6, the English department hosted a live reading of the epic poem Paradise Lost, by John Milton.

Volunteers sat around the big oval table in the Fager Lounge and read the more than 10,000 lines from 12 books.

“The Miltonathon, which began last year, is a tribute to my late friend and colleague Professor George Hudson, who taught Milton at Colgate for over forty years,” said Professor Deborah Knuth Kleck, who now teaches the Milton course at Colgate, and started this event.

Marathon readings of Paradise Lost at other colleges exist, but Kunth Kleck has never heard of one that has the reader play parts. Participants at Colgate divided up roles as they read, so sometimes the narrator had only a couple of words — like “she said” — before a speech resumed. “Professor Judith Oliver, emerita professor of art and art history, for example, got to be God!” reported Kunth Kleck.

The day included a snake cake (pictured above, designed and executed by local baker Sharon Stevens) and live tweeting on Colgate’s Twitter feed. Every tweet was written by English major Emily Daniel ’18.

See all the posts below, including a video by Lizzie Souter ’16 and revised for 2016 by Dylann McLaughlin ’18.​

Read more


Applying lessons from the Sophomore Residential Seminar experience

March 11, 2016
Members of the fall 2015 Sophomore Residential Seminar course Immigrant and Sexual Cultures on location in San Francisco in front of the Golden Gate Bridge

Members of the fall 2015 Sophomore Residential Seminar course Immigrant and Sexual Cultures on location in San Francisco

As spring break approaches, the fall seems like a very long time ago. For members of the five Sophomore Residential Seminars (SRS), this is especially true, since the intensive learning, community-building, and travel experiences of the first semester have given way to a comparatively quiet second semester.

SRS remains present in our everyday lives, however, because the lessons we learned in the fall are meant to be applied to the new classes and spaces that we find ourselves in now.
Read more


Wolk conference explores health care challenges and opportunities

March 2, 2016
Wolk Medical Conference attendees ask a question of Michael J. Wolk '60.

Michael J. Wolk ’60 takes questions from the audience at the 2016 Wolk Medical Conference on campus

Students seeking their vocation in America’s challenging health care system could benefit from a liberal arts mix of biology, economics, and philosophy.

Kicking off the 2016 Michael J. Wolk ’60 Conference on Medical Education last month, the nationally renowned cardiologist and conference namesake stated that just five percent of the population consumes 50 percent of the health care spending in the United States.

“We also need to address the fact that one percent of drugs account for 33 percent of pharmaceutical spending,” Wolk said.

These and other sobering statistics, which show the United States lagging behind other developed countries in health care outcomes while outpacing them in spending, highlight the difficult problems facing providers in the years to come. That’s why Wolk returns to Colgate every two years to help current students explore the industry on which he has made an indelible mark.

Read more


Buzzer beater by Austin Tillotson ’16 makes ESPN SportsCenter

February 22, 2016

Sunday’s men’s basketball game was a senior day to remember for Austin Tillotson ’16, from York, Pa. Tillotson’s family was at the game, his younger sister sang the national anthem, and his late-game heroics were hailed on SportsCenter as the top highlight of the night, caught by Bob Raiber ’68, P’02.

 

As tradition dictates on senior day, Tillotson’s career was celebrated before the game, along with fellow senior Alex Ramon (Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain), who posted a career-high 18 points on 7-of-10 shooting. Read about the lead up to the game on the Colgate athletics game report, or watch the highlights below.

Related Links:
Division I Athletics
Prospective Division I recruits
Athlete Alumni 


The history department takes over Twitter

February 19, 2016

On Monday, February 15, the Department of History took over the official Colgate University Twitter feed.

Led by students Warren Dennis ’16 and Kristy Saldana ’18, the department posted about faculty, students, and alumni — they even threw in a little history of Colgate.

“It was very nerve-racking at first,” said Saldana. “But once we started hearing so much positive feedback from students on campus and the engagement of people on Twitter, it made this an amazing experience.”

Dennis live-tweeted a senior seminar, wherein the class discussed Kirsten Weld’s book, Paper Cadavers. Weld replied:

 

See the entire day below.


Lights, camera, Colgate internships

February 12, 2016
Actor Michael Shannon prepares for a scene in the filming of Pottersville in Hamilton, N.Y., in January

Actor Michael Shannon (left) prepares for a scene during the filming of Pottersville in January. (Photo by Andrew Daddio)

When actor and director Ron Perlman cast Colgate’s hometown of Hamilton, N.Y., as the setting for his new movie, Pottersville, in January, Colgate film and media studies students were ready for internship opportunities in movie-making magic.

The light-hearted comedy stars Michael Shannon and Judy Greer, and includes the acting talents of Michael Torpey ’02.

The filming was identified by Colgate’s Center for Career Services and film and media studies program as an excellent opportunity for students in the concentration. Within a few short weeks, six internships were established, including everything from managing extras to wardrobe to set design.

Read more


Professor Catherine Cardelús featured in Nature.com article

February 11, 2016
Catherine Cardelús "A Lab in the Canopy"

Catherine Cardelus “A Lab in the Canopy”

Colgate Associate Professor of Biology Catherine Cardelús was featured recently in a Nature.com article called “Fieldwork: Extreme research.”

Nature.com talks about the literal and metaphorical heights to which Cardelús must climb in order to pursue her investigations. According to the article, “[it] requires climbing up ropes while battling jungle heat and fending off biting insects. On each climb, she lugs a heavy pack filled with sample-collecting tags and bags, tape measures, notebooks, walkie-talkies, water, lunch, and other supplies for days of work that can keep her in the trees for up to seven hours at a time.”

Due to the unpredictable nature of the work that Cardelús does in the canopy, “you constantly have to be open to the possibility that you can’t do what you need to do,” she told Nature.com.

To find out more about Cardelús and her research, check out the Colgate Scene feature “A Lab in the Canopy,” written by Sarah Hewitt.

Related:
Catherine Cardelús receives interdisciplinary grant
Catherine Cardelús bio
Research opportunities in Biology
Working with Dolphins in the Florida Keys


From the Colgate Scene: Machine Project and the Hamiltonians

February 4, 2016
Chris Kallmyer adjusts sound levels on his computer while students rake leaves

Regional Raking with Chris Kallmyer from the Colgate Scene (Photo by Andrew Daddio)

Last fall, 11 artists conducted experiments with the Colgate and Hamilton communities, posing philosophical questions that included: What is art?

Machine Project is a Los Angeles–based organization “that works with artists to develop new projects often involving performance or participation with the public,” explained founder Mark Allen. Its troupe has traveled the world, performing in various combinations and sites, but this was the first time they collaborated with a whole town.

Events ranged from interpretive dance, to protest songs, to intuition workshops. “Machine Project is part of a larger genre, which is sometimes called social practice,” said art and art history professor DeWitt Godfrey, who invited the group to Colgate. “Artists use the relationships between people or within communities as a kind of material — not just a setting, but actually how people interact with each other and what that says about who we are.”

As Colgate prepares to celebrate the performing arts during a weekend-long event this March, the Scene features the story of the Machine Project, its artistic interactions with Colgate and the Village of Hamilton. Keep reading to define the undefinable, discover an original duplicate, protest the protest song, and much more.

Related Links
Department of Arts and Art History 

The Arts on Campus

About Hamilton, N.Y. 


Students capture life in new exhibition

January 22, 2016
Photo by Madeline Bailey '18 as part of the Captured by the Lens exhibition, currently on display

A photograph by Madison Bailey ’18 — with the working title Flathands — which is part of the Captured by the Lens exhibition, currently on display.

From family moments, to campus life and selfies, student photography filled a new exhibition, called Captured by the Lens, at Colgate’s Longyear Museum of Anthropology and two other locations. Read more


Denise Larson ’19: A Letter To My Fellow Second Semester Classmates

January 16, 2016
Photo by Denise Larsen '19

Photo by Denise Larson ’19

Dear Class of 2019,

I had an experience the other day that forced me to think deeply about something that is of immediate importance to us all. I attended a holiday brunch, and my neighbor asked me: “Can you believe you finished your first semester of college?” My answer: “Not at all…I mean kinda yes?” My neighbor probably expected that as a college student I’d be a little more articulate, but as I spoke, that question struck me as surprisingly complex.

It’s a question that we all must consider. Whether or not we’ve realized it, we’re in an odd place. As winter break comes to a close, it’s notable that the last time we were away from campus for this long, many of us had only ever been there on a college visit. Yet, as we flock back to campus with the same magnitude of peers that we encountered on move-in day, we’ve got a full semester under our belt, and that’s significant.

In terms of what this means in regards to second semester, let me break down my disjointed answer to the not-so-simple question.

Read more


Colgate Videographer Brian Ness: My five favorite videos of 2015

December 28, 2015
Colgate Memorial Chapel

Memorial Chapel featured in the video “Colgate from Above”

(Editor’s note: we asked Brian Ness, Colgate’s video journalist, to pick his five favorite videos of 2015.)

Colgate from above
Not long ago, this shot would have involved a lot of equipment and a massive budget. Now it just takes the deft talents of Ahmad Khazaee ’05, a quadcopter flying ace.

Frosty Fall morning
This is the reason I always have a camera in my car. One morning, after I parked, I took a quick walk and grabbed these shots — good way to start the day.

Colgate Fund Journey
With this collection of videos, we decided to not use dialogue, making it an interesting challenge to completely tell a story using just visuals. It really was amazing to work with someone as talented as Allison Spanyer ’16, who is able to communicate so much with just a subtle expression.

Experimenting with Lava
Professor Karen Harpp’s class was experimenting with actual lava in Syracuse. They invited me to come and shoot the results. How often do you get to eat a steak that was cooked over molten rock?

Mark Dion
As the Christian A. Johnson Endeavor Foundation Artist in Residence during the spring semester of 2015, Mark Dion invited students and Hamilton community members to create their own art. The results were featured in this display, which I filmed. My personal favorite is the jackalope.

Relevant:

Karen Harpp wins the 2015 Balmuth teaching award.
The complete Colgate in 13 seconds playlist.
The Colgate Fund.
The best photographs of 2013

 

 


Kiplinger ranks Colgate for value

December 18, 2015
(Photo by Andrew Daddio)

(Photo by Andrew Daddio)

A new list released by Kiplinger this week ranks Colgate University 10th among the top 100 best values in liberal arts colleges, and 19th overall among all schools ranked for value.

Kiplinger’s rankings system is entirely data driven, and their report cites Colgate’s student performance for median earnings 10 years after graduation ($61,500), low student debt, a high average need-based aid award, and a 90-percent four-year graduation rate. Additional metrics include admission rates, average SAT and ACT scores of incoming first-year students, and the school’s retention rate.

“Neither our opinion nor anyone else’s affects the calculation,” Kiplinger’s website states.

Read more


Urban Sociology goes to New York City

December 11, 2015
People standing outside on a street, waiting for a punk show to begin at ABC No Rio (Photo by Chandler Wood)

Waiting for a punk show to begin at ABC No Rio (Photo by Chandler Wood ’17)

The following post was submitted by Professor Kim Creasap, and published on the Sociology and Anthropology blog.

On October 24, 2015, 16 students in SOC 305: Urban Sociology and I traveled to the Lower East Side of Manhattan to conduct mini-ethnographies of various places and spaces in the neighborhood. An important site of New York City history and contemporary urban change, the Lower East Side offered us an incredible range of locations and communities to illustrate course themes.

Read more


Penny Lane’s new film NUTS! to premiere at Sundance

December 7, 2015
animation from the movie NUTS! showing Dr. John Romulus Brinkley, an eccentric genius who built an empire in Depression-era America with a goat testicle impotence cure

NUTS!, from assistant professor Penny Lane, will premiere at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival

NUTS!, a new documentary film by assistant professor of art and art history Penny Lane, will premiere at next month’s Sundance Film Festival. NUTS! tells the story of John Romulus Brinkley, who, in 1917, offered a cure for impotence by transplanting goat testicles.

“Sundance is by far the premiere venue to launch an American independent feature film,” Lane said. “I was overjoyed by the invitation, and I am really excited to see how the audience there responds to the film.”

The New York Times, citing the festival’s lineup guide, reports, “In keeping with a recent trend in documentary filmmaking, nontraditional, sometimes controversial storytelling techniques will be on full display [at Sundance] … The director Penny Lane, for instance, uses animated re-enactments and ‘one seriously unreliable narrator’ to trace the ‘mostly true’ story of a man who found success selling a goat-testicle impotence cure.”

Portrait of Penny Lane

Penny Lane

Lane’s previous credits include Our Nixon, a documentary featuring home movies shot by President Richard Nixon’s aides, and The Voyagers, a short film about “two small spacecraft, an epic journey, taking risks, and falling in love. Also Carl Sagan.” Lane traveled the hemisphere in search of background information for NUTS! Her expeditions — and the film itself — were funded by the New York State Council on the Arts, Creative Capital, the Tribeca Film Institute, the Colgate University Research Council, and a successful $80,000 Kickstarter campaign.

“A campaign like that has the added effect of creating a small but enthusiastic army of fans who feel like they were in it ‘from the beginning.,’” Lane said.

Find out more at brinkleyfilm.com and, in the weeks ahead, on the Sundance Film Festival website.


Interim Provost Constance Harsh invited to White House roundtable

November 21, 2015
Sustainability at Colgate University

Colgate’s sustainability efforts recognized by White House

On November 19, Interim Dean of the Faculty and Provost Constance Harsh participated in a roundtable discussion at the White House to take part in launching the American Campuses Act on Climate day of action.

“It was very good to witness the serious purpose that animated the participants,” Harsh said after the event. “Students have a real sense of urgency about this. Higher education has an important role to play here.”

Harsh joined a select group of higher education presidents, other campus and business leaders, as well as high-ranking government officials, including EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy and Karen Florini of the State Department, at the White House event.

Colgate has a nationally renowned commitment to sustainability. On Wednesday, Interim President Jill Harsin reiterated our commitment to sustainability in a letter to the White House. Specifically, Colgate’s commitments include:

  • Achieving carbon neutrality by 2019, our bicentennial
  • Making carbon neutrality and sustainability a part of the curriculum and other educational experiences for all students
  • Incorporating sustainable practices in all campus planning and building design from inception to implementation
  • Achieving a minimum of LEED Silver standards for all new construction and major renovations
  • Enhancing teaching and learning, creating long-term economic resiliency, building and restoring robust ecological systems, and supporting a healthier and more just society

“I am proud that Colgate is one of the higher education leaders in confronting climate change, particularly in our pledge to achieve carbon neutrality by 2019,” said Harsh.

Colgate also participated in the #ActOnCampus hashtag on Twitter, showing some of our sustainability successes.


First residential commons named for Diane Ciccone ’74, P’10

November 12, 2015
Students hold up a sign reading "Welcome to the Ciccone Commons"

Students celebrate the naming of Ciccone Commons (Photo by Nick Gilbert ’18)

Colgate’s inaugural residential commons, which opened its doors on Arrival Day 2015, will be named for Diane Ciccone ’74, P’10. Commons residents made the choice by popular vote after reviewing a slate of important names in Colgate’s history.

“I am humbled and honored with the naming of Ciccone Commons,” Ciccone said. “It not only recognizes my lifetime commitment to Colgate but more importantly it acknowledges the many voices of women and people of color in Colgate’s story — a story that will be woven into the historical fabric of the institution’s commitment to coeducation and inclusion.” Read more


“Queen of Soul” Aretha Franklin to perform at Colgate

November 10, 2015
Portrait of Aretha Franklin

Aretha Franklin

Legendary vocalist Aretha Franklin will perform on campus as part of the Kerschner Family Series Global Leaders at Colgate at 7 p.m. on Saturday, March 5, 2016, in Sanford Field House. Tickets for the Colgate community and the general public will be released in mid-January — watch colgate.edu/globalleaders for details as they become available.

Known around the world by her first name, and as the reigning “Queen of Soul,” Franklin’s repertoire spans pop, soul, jazz, rock, blues, and gospel.

Franklin was named the #1 Vocalist of All Time by Rolling Stone magazine in 2009. The first woman to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987, she is the recipient of numerous awards, including 18 Grammys, five American Music Awards, and four NAACP Image awards. To date, she has received 12 honorary doctorate degrees.

The Global Leaders series, sponsored by Colgate’s Parents’ and Grandparents’ Fund, allows the university to invite inspirational leaders like Franklin to campus. Other guests have included former prime minister of Israel, Shimon Peres; Sir Richard Branson, Virgin Group founder; Hillary Clinton, former secretary of state; President Bill Clinton; Russian political activist Gary Kasparov; Tony Blair, former prime minister of Great Britain; Felipe Calderón, former president of Mexico; and the Dalai Lama, spiritual leader of Tibetan Buddhism.

Related Links
Global Leaders at Colgate
Hillary Clinton defends America’s role as world leader during Global Leaders address
Richard Branson to Colgate University: ‘The world needs entrepreneurs’
Aretha Franklin on Twitter


Students to launch online course for kids

November 6, 2015
BreadX video shoot

Four classmates work to record a video for the BreadX online course.

A lot of science, engineering, artistry, and culture have gone into that piece of crusty, buttered bread devoured at the dinner table. It’s those elements that are the basis for a new open online course, BreadX, soon to be launched by Colgate first-year undergraduates for use by school-age students, grades six and up, worldwide.

Starting November 15, BreadX: From Ground to Global, on the EdX Edge platform, will guide participants in scholarly exploration of one of the world’s most ubiquitous foods and its global connections.

Read more