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Colgate’s Picker Interdisciplinary Science Institute funds two more research projects

March 24, 2014
Colgate professor Jonathan Levine and his collaborators are designing a novel mass spectrometer to try to better determine the ages of rocks on Mars.

Colgate professor Jonathan Levine and his collaborators are designing a novel mass spectrometer to try to better determine the ages of rocks on Mars.

Two interdisciplinary science research projects featuring collaborations among faculty from Colgate and from around the world have been awarded funding by the Picker Interdisciplinary Science Institute at Colgate.

The projects support the core mission of the institute, which aims to foster the creation of new knowledge that is obtainable only through the development of sustained interdisciplinary research.

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Get to know: Jeff Bary, assistant professor of physics and astronomy

December 18, 2013
Photo by Andrew Daddio

Photo by Andrew Daddio

Jeff Bary, assistant professor of physics and astronomy, talks about how his passion for astronomy developed, his research interests, favorite course to teach, and more in this Q&A.

An astronomer is born. When I was nine, a friend gave me a book about astronomy titled What’s Up There? by Dinah Moche, which I read countless times. My dad, a middle-school science teacher, encouraged me to pursue the subject. He organized a series of events celebrating Halley’s Comet’s last visit in 1986. I was hooked. Read more


Teaching moment turns into photo opportunity as aurora borealis makes campus appearance

October 9, 2013
Professor Tom Balonek photographed the aurora borealis Tuesday night on campus.

Professor Tom Balonek photographed the aurora borealis Tuesday night on campus.

Professor Tom Balonek and students in his Solar System Astronomy and his Astronomical Techniques courses were lucky enough Tuesday night to observe the aurora borealis from campus.

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Professor Jeff Bary hopes multidisciplinary series sheds light on mountaintop removal mining

September 18, 2013
Mountaintop removal practices were used on this mountain in West Virginia. The mountain had been covered with trees like those in the background.

Mountaintop removal practices were used on this mountain in West Virginia. The mountain had been covered with trees like those hills in the background.

Appalachia is a region deeply connected to the history of the United States, yet rarely makes the headlines.

Jeff Bary, assistant professor of physics and astronomy, aims to change that by introducing a multidisciplinary series to Colgate honoring Appalachian culture and, more importantly, bringing awareness to what he considers a social and environmental crisis known as mountaintop removal.

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U.S. Rep. Richard Hanna meets with students, faculty, and staff during visit to Colgate

September 17, 2013
U.S. Rep. Richard Hanna (right) talks with Professors Krista Ingram (center) and Randy Fuller (left) Monday.

U.S. Rep. Richard Hanna (right) talks with Professors Krista Ingram (center) and Randy Fuller (left) Monday. (Photo by Andy Daddio)

U.S. Rep. Richard Hanna, R-Barneveld, connected with the Colgate University community Monday, meeting with faculty, administrators, and students, discussing issues ranging from natural-gas fracking to political gridlock and the federal budget sequester.

After hearing Michael Hayes, professor of political science, describe Colgate’s Washington D.C. Study Group, Hanna immediately handed Hayes a business card and said he wants to meet with students when they travel to the nation’s capital for the spring 2014 semester.

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International Digistar conference comes to Colgate

July 29, 2013
Students from across academic disciplines are able to take advantage of the Ho Tung Visualization Lab facility.

Students from across academic disciplines are able to take advantage of the Ho Tung Visualization Lab facility.

Digistar Users Group members from around the world are now gathered at Colgate’s Ho Tung Visualization Lab for their 26th annual conference.

Hamilton, N.Y., joins sites in Germany, Japan, Canada, India, and the Netherlands as a conference host for users of the Digistar projection system, the technological heart of Colgate’s unique visualization lab.

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Summer research between students and professors at Colgate

July 24, 2013
Posters

Stephanie Maripen ’15 explains her research into the genetic factors affecting skull shape and body size in poodles. (Photo by Andy Daddio)

Summer certainly means pool parties, lazy afternoons, and hot dogs on the grill. At Colgate, summer also means time for some serious research.

A sampling of about 150 students conducting summer research on campus presented their findings at the Robert H.N. Ho Science Center last week. The research on display spanned a wide range of disciplines, from biology and neuroscience to geology and sociology, to name a few.

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Professor Anthony Aveni receives national recognition for interdisciplinary work

May 6, 2013

Tony Aveni, Russell Colgate Distinguished University Professor of Astronomy and Anthropology and Native American Studies, teaches a class in the Ho Science Center.

Professor Anthony Aveni has a lot to celebrate.

As students mark their last week of the spring semester, the Russell Colgate Distinguished University Professor of Astronomy and Anthropology and Native American Studies marks the conclusion of his 100th semester teaching at Colgate.

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Colgate physics majors stand out at annual conference

April 22, 2013

“Did you hear the one about the new restaurant NASA is building on the moon? It has great food but no …”

This was the kind of question asked of undergraduates during Physpardy, the “geekiest of competitions” (according to Professor Enrique Galvez) that was held at the annual Rochester Symposium for Physics Students. Colgate placed second in the Jeopardy knockoff, competing against college teams from Houghton, Rochester, West Point, SUNY, and Siena.

A student works with laser experiments in Prof. Kiko Galvez’s physics lab in Colgate’s Robert H.N. Ho Science Center. (photo 2008)

The Colgate contingent was led by physics professors Enrique Galvez and Ken Segall.  Galvez brought the juniors Carrie Brurgess ’14, Fiora Cheng ’14, Brett Ross ’14 to talk about quantum optics. Segall led seniors Matt Brunetti ’13, Sean Guo ’13, and Ryan Freeman ’13, to talk about their research in physics.

“I was really impressed with the research being done by undergraduates at other universities,” said Freeman, “but I have to say that I really think that Colgate’s undergraduate research stands out.” He said that is likely due to absence of graduate students at the university, who would likely draw the attention of professors.

“We, as undergraduates, are a more integral part of the research being done here,” Freeman said.

Galvez, a leader in the field of teaching quantum mechanics, was recently featured in a Scientific American roadshow.

Other questions at the event included:

In the category Alphabet: “Speed of light in a vacuum.”
In the category Newton’s gravity: “The number of “g’s” you’d experience if you’re on a planet with half the earth’s radius and half its mass.”

In the comment field, add your answers — in the form of questions of course.


Faculty appointments and promotions announced

March 20, 2013

Provost and Dean of the Faculty Douglas A. Hicks recently announced faculty appointments and promotions that had been approved by the university’s Board of Trustees. Read more


Making news: Professor Enrique Galvez in Scientific American

March 18, 2013

“The first time I ever saw quantum entanglement for myself was in August 2011 on a road trip to Colgate University,” wrote George Musser in an article called “George and John’s Excellent Adventures in Quantum Entanglement, Part Two.

Professor Enrique Galvez built a machine to observe quantum entanglement, and demonstrated it to Musser and a crew from Scientific American. Watch the video below:

For more Colgate faculty making news, visit the Newsroom.


From lab to lecture, astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson tours Colgate

February 26, 2013
Neil deGrasse Tyson (lower left) visited Colgate's Ho Tung Visualization Lab.

Neil deGrasse Tyson (lower left) visits Colgate’s Ho Tung Visualization Lab. (Photo by Andy Daddio)

Seeing Neil deGrasse Tyson deliver an exuberant lecture to a standing-room crowd at Memorial Chapel is an amazing experience, and hundreds of students took advantage of that Monday night. Now imagine being a physics or astronomy major with the opportunity to share your research with the acclaimed astrophysicist.

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Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson to speak at Memorial Chapel on February 25

February 12, 2013
Neil deGrasse Tyson

Neil deGrasse Tyson will be at Colgate February 25.

Acclaimed astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson will speak at Colgate’s Memorial Chapel at 7 p.m. Monday, February 25.

Tyson is director of the Hayden Planetarium at the Rose Center for Earth and Space and a research associate in the department of astrophysics at the American Museum of Natural History. He is a highly regarded spokesman for science through his numerous books and TV programs, and he has received the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal, the highest civilian honor bestowed by NASA.

His talk at the Chapel will be on “Ten Things You Should Know about the Universe,” and a book-signing reception will follow at the Ho Science Center.

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Colgate professor awarded observing time on Hubble Space Telescope

October 16, 2012

The Hubble Space Telescope was launched in 1990. (Photo courtesy of NASA)

Securing observing time on the Hubble Space Telescope is a highly desirable and extremely competitive process for astronomers. There are hundreds more projects submitted than can be accommodated, and the selection criteria is stringent.

Colgate astronomy professor Jeff Bary and collaborator Tracy Beck of the Space Telescope Science Institute, though, were recently awarded 12 orbits, or about 9 hours worth of observing time, to collect data for their investigations into the formation of binary stars that might eventually host their own planetary systems. Read more


Colgate professors’ view of incoming students: it’s all academic

August 29, 2012

Members of Class of 2016 form new bonds

First-year students spend their first days at Colgate navigating new terrain, organizing their living spaces, meeting classmates, and otherwise adjusting to life in their new milieu. What they are doing intrigues professors of psychology, anthropology, physics, sociology, and many other disciplines.

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