Home News
Colgate News

NEWS

Professor Eddie Watkins publishes paper in journal with current student, alumnus

March 17, 2015
Researchers hold the fern they discovered

Rehman Momin ’15, Professor Eddie Watkins, Caridad Zúñiga Calvo, and Weston Testo ’12 (left to right) holding the fern named after Caridad. (Photo by Jarmilla Pitterman)

Colgate professor Eddie Watkins published a new paper in the journal Brittonia with Rehman Momin ’15, Wes Testo ’12 and Jarmilla Pitterman, a professor at UC Santa Cruz. Brittonia is a specialized botanical journal managed by the New York Botanical Garden. The article outlines the discovery of a rare new hybrid fern in Costa Rica. Read more


Colgate faculty ‘Yak Back’

December 12, 2014

UPDATE: the New York Times ran an article exploring Yik Yak on the College campus. It mentions the Colgate faculty Yak back.

To quote a recent post on Yik Yak, the notoriously negative mobile application, “Professors have been successfully re-introduced into the Yak environment [and] the ecological consequences should be fascinating.”

Indeed they are.

The campaign began when Geoff Holm, associate professor of biology, noticed a few positive posts from faculty members on the app, but those voices were failing to gain traction.

“I thought that if there was a more coordinated effort, especially at the end of the semester, it could bring a more positive vibe to the campus,” Holm said. He credited his biology colleague Prof. Eddie Watkins with suggesting that posters identify themselves.

A screenshot from December 12.

A screenshot from December 12.

“Yes,” said Watkins. “I think we should all be putting our names on there. The students are loving it and my Yakarma is 1174!”

So far, more than 50 professors have posted messages, ranging from the silly to the sublime. There is much sleep-related advice and encouragement, and also a few newbies to the platform. Some of the posts have garnered more than 100 “up votes.”

Prof. Metzler: “While it’s impossible to do everything you need to do and get sleep, take it from someone with a seven-week old; sleep is important for brain function…wishing I got more of it!”

Outdoor Ed had other advice: “I hear sledding and snowball fights are great stress relievers…Come to OE and borrow a sled.”

Prof. Woods: “Thanks to the students at Colgate for making my job fun. I’m sorry I can’t always return the favor, but you know I love ya.”

Prof Scull: “Shout out to my GEOG245 class for a fabulous (yet hard) discussion of the societal consequence of GIS (e.g., the yak)”

Marlowe: “Saw a student helping an elderly man dig out his car the other day. You guys are awesome”

Prof. Page: Sending good vibes Colgate and good luck next week – all out in the open. Life’s so much better out in the open

With so much goodness in the air, even anonymous posts can be nice: “To all of the professors, thank you. What a wonderful, happy thing to wake up to in the morning. You all made my and many other students’ days.”


Professor Jason Meyers teaches biology course as part of college-in-prison program

December 11, 2014

A microscope, test tubes, and dissected organs — these aren’t typically found in a prison. But, when Colgate professor Jason Meyers signed on to teach a biology course at a local correctional facility, these learning materials made their way into a rather unlikely classroom. Read more


Professor Ahmet Ay and students merge biology, math, and computer science in published papers

November 4, 2014
Colgate Professor Ahmet Ay

Professor Ahmet Ay worked with students on two different academic papers published in the journal Development. (Photo by Dylan Crouse ’15)

When Jack Holland ‘13, Adriana Sperlea ‘14, and Sebastian Sangervasi ’14 first began studying zebrafish with Assistant Professor of Biology and Mathematics Ahmet Ay, they probably never thought they’d end up published in one of the country’s most well-known biology journals.

But that’s exactly what happened.

Read more


Two faculty perspectives on ebola

October 3, 2014

Two recent talks by Colgate professors give some context to the ebola outbreak response from two angles, one by a virologist examining the nature of epidemics, and the other from a perspective of government response, specifically in Liberia.

Mary Moran

Mary Moran

Read more


National Science Foundation grants foster faculty research

September 12, 2014
Professor Michael Loranty was among several Colgate professors in Siberia photo by Logan Burner I've also included a photo of thawing permafrost (which is relevant to the proposal), the person under the bug jacket is me and the photo was taken in Siberia by Logan Berner. studies permafrost

Geography professor Michael Loranty studies permafrost in Siberia. Loranty was one of several Colgate professors who recently received an NSF grant. Photo by Logan Berner

Professors researching a wide array of subjects — from privacy software to fieldwork in the Galapagos — recently received National Science Foundation grant awards totaling $1,328,055. Read more


Plant power: summer research on traditional medicine

August 4, 2014
Peter Juviler ’15, Mae Staples ’15, and Kelly French ’15,

Peter Juviler ’15, Kelly French ’15, and Mae Staples ’15 in Colgate’s greenhouse, where they’ve been growing plants to study their medicinal properties.

Colgate students are sharing their experiences conducting research with faculty members on campus and in the field. This post is by Peter Juviler ’15, Mae Staples ’15, and Kelly French ’15, who are being advised by Frank Frey, associate professor of biology and environmental studies.

For centuries, the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) people have used plants to treat a variety of physical ailments. We are studying those plants that are native to New York State — specifically their ability to kill certain human-infecting bacteria. Read more


Cancer research leads to publication and honors for Colgate students

June 28, 2014
Changchang Liu '15, works with biology Professor Engda Hagos on cancer research during a 2014 summer internship.

Changchang Liu ’15, works with biology professor Engda Hagos on cancer research during her summer internship. (Photo by Andy Daddio)

Two Colgate students and their professor have been published in The Journal of Molecular Carcinogenesis for new research into the regulatory processes that maintains genomic stability, which is impaired in cancer cells. This could one day lead to new treatments.

Changchang Liu ’15, Stephen La Rosa ‘13 and Assistant Professor of Biology Engda Hagos received a grant from the Picker Interdisciplinary Science Institute at Colgate. Liu is the first author on the published paper, which Hagos says is huge for a student.

“In this field, it takes at least two or three, sometimes four, years to publish one paper. It’s not easy,” Hagos said.

For her published research, Liu was also one of 10 students nationwide to be awarded a Meritorious Honor at the ninth annual Undergraduate Students Caucus and Poster Competition of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Liu cited making new findings as the most exciting part of her research. “Doing the research and making this discovery is kind of like discovering a secret, like a treasure, that only you know, literally, because you just discovered it.”

In addition to Liu’s earlier research, she is now on campus for her third summer in a row working with Hagos. Under the mentorship of Hagos, Liu and two other students, Margaret Wolsey ’17 and Matt Szuchnicki ’15, are studying autophagy, a process by which a cell eats itself so that it can recycle its nutrients. This process has been implicated in many human diseases including cancer.

“He’s very patient and he really cares how you feel about your project,” Liu said about Hagos. “He makes sure you understand what you’re doing and the concepts behind what you are studying, which really helps me grow as a researcher. The close interaction is what made many of the ideas and the entire project possible.”

Liu will go straight from her research in the lab at Colgate to the world-renowned campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. As part of the Colgate NIH Study Group, Liu will take classes and study cancer cell multi-drug resistance in an NIH laboratory.

Hagos remarked, “She’s doing something important. She is one step ahead.”


Picker Interdisciplinary Science Institute provides second round of funding to researchers

June 6, 2014
Sacred forest around Ethiopian church.

Researchers are investigating whether and how cultural and religious stewardship of sacred forests reduces negative impacts on these compromised ecosystems.

A second year of funding provided by the Picker Interdisciplinary Science Institute at Colgate will allow faculty researchers to further their exploration of the cultural and religious stewardship of sacred forest ecosystems in Ethiopia.

Damhnait McHugh, director of the institute, announced the award to Colgate professors Catherine Cardelús (biology), Eliza Kent (religion), Peter Klepeis (geography), Peter Scull (geography), and Carrie Woods (biology). They are collaborating with Izabela Orlowska and Alemayehu Wassie Eshete, both of Bahir Dar University, Ethiopia.

The $90,000 research award will allow the researchers to continue their assessment of Ethiopian forests maintained as sacred sites around Christian Orthodox Tewahido churches.

Read more


Colgate seniors present research to leading scholars in Japan

April 16, 2014
J&M traveling_WEB

Jessica Huang ’14 and Michael Manansala ’14 presented their research at Kobe University in Japan and also had time for some independent travel.

Over spring break, Jessica Huang ’14 and Michael Manansala ’14 put the capstone on a research project that they’ve been working on for much of their Colgate careers. Traveling to Kansai, Japan, the seniors presented their research titled “Does observing or producing different types of hand gestures help second-language auditory learning of Japanese short and long vowels?” Read more