When New York Magazine planned an article on presidential temperament, they went to psychology professor Rebecca Shiner, the editor of the Handbook of Temperament for her thoughts on the subject.

The article is titled “What Is ‘Presidential Temperament,’ Anyway?” and it analyzes the history, science — and political implications — of temperament.

Temperament is an issue in this election because, during the first debate, Donald Trump suggested his “winning temperament” was his biggest asset, yet many people have asked whether his temperament makes him unsuitable for the Presidency.

The author of the New York Magazine piece, Drake Baer, thinks temperament isn’t a new consideration in U.S. Presidential elections: “The discussion of ‘presidential temperament’ is long (it goes back to the country’s founding) and weird (because the political usage doesn’t match up with the scientific understanding, except when it does).”

Drawing on her research on personality development, Shiner offers insights into how temperament is expressed and its role in shaping life outcomes. The Handbook of Temperament considers “… the pivotal role of temperament in parent-child interactions, attachment, peer relationships, and the development of adolescent and adult personality and psychopathology.”

As the 2016 election comes to a close, the expertise of Colgate professors continues to inform students and the media.

Read the full article at New York Magazine.

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